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AirVenture Roadmap

AirVenture Roadmap

A report on the 2018 Gathering at Waupaca, a recap of Oshkosh—and tips to help you plan your next trip.

Based on what I saw (and a lot of the things I didn’t have the energy or time to see this year), AirVenture is now officially on the aviation must-do map like it’s never been before. I have no doubt that whatever in aviation holds your interest, you’ll be able to find it, learn more about it or do it at AirVenture. 

The Gathering 

One of the many benefits of being a Piper Flyer Association member is The Gathering at Waupaca.

More than 70 PFA members started arriving early for The Gathering at the Waupaca Municipal Airport in Wisconsin (KPCZ) on Friday, July 20. The official welcome reception barbecue took place 24 hours later on Saturday afternoon, at a hangar at the airport. 

Waupaca is 29 nm northwest of Wittman Regional Airport at Oshkosh (KOSH), the site of AirVenture. Since most inbound traffic to AirVenture is over there, flying into Waupaca is stress-free (relatively speaking) compared to the infamous Fisk VFR arrival process onto the grounds at AirVenture. 

Waupaca has an RNAV approach to the runway down to 500 and a mile. It’s also so much easier to depart from Waupaca when it’s time to finally head home. There’s none of that 22-airplanes-ahead-of-you conga line action, and Waupaca’s Avgas price is quite reasonable ($4.10 per gallon when I was there). 

Jennifer and Kent arrange ground transportation for members landing at KPCZ to and from the event hotel, the Par 4 Resort. But that’s not all.

The cost of The Gathering this year was a measly $110 for early registrants and $125 for those that missed the early opportunity. Where I live—and it is expensive here in California—it’s pretty easy to spend that many dollars for a good meal with wine for two. The Gathering bucks are a prudent outlay, since they include three meals, bus transportation back and forth to AirVenture for the first three days of the show, and maintenance and product seminars all day Sunday.

The Gathering provides a great value and a convenient way for members to meet other Piper owners, trade flying stories, compare purchases and get to and from AirVenture. Oh, and Gathering members are automatically entered in the door prize raffle Sunday afternoon after the presentations. This year, every Gathering attendee took home at least one door prize. It’s a can’t-lose deal.

Hotel costs for PFA members in Waupaca average a little over $125 per night for a room with two beds at the Comfort Suites Foxfire. 

For the first three days of the show, members can eat a free breakfast at the hotel and then board a bus to be whisked to Oshkosh. Then in the afternoon, after adventuring, shopping, learning and getting together with old friends, everyone gets back on the bus for a no-stress ride back to the hotel in Waupaca. 

This arrangement is one of the most stress-free ways to “do” AirVenture and is so cost-effective that fly-in members who attend The Gathering can scratch the cost of car rental off their AirVenture budget sheet. 

One-day admission tickets to AirVenture in 2018 were $34 for EAA members and weekly passes were $125. Ticket costs were around 30 percent higher for non-members. 

The Gathering at Waupaca group poses with their raffle prizes. Each attendee went home with something.
Lunch on Sunday of the Gathering, one of three meals included for Gathering attendees.

 

A&P/IA Steve Ells discussed owner-performed maintenance at this year’s Gathering.
A little bit of weather

Despite weather cells that dumped buckets of rain in the Oshkosh area Friday and overcast skies Saturday that slowed AirVenture-bound arrivals to a trickle prior to the official start of the show Monday, over 10,000 airplanes eventually touched down and stayed for at least a day. 

The numbers and facts about AirVenture 2018 are getting close to hard-to-believe. Attendance increased again, as more than 601,000 folks from all corners of the United States and many foreign countries passed through the gates during the seven-day show. Campers in tents and motorhomes packed over 12,600 sites. The number of show planes reached 2,979, and there were 867 commercial exhibitors spread across the width and breadth of the grounds. 

I especially like the opportunities available at AirVenture to approach and get to know the vendors that provide information on everything from fuel cells to avionics, ADS-B options, Rajay turbocharger systems and whatever else could interest a pilot/owner. (For a list of the speakers at the 2018 Gathering at Waupaca, see Page 52. —Ed.)

If you seek face-to-face discussions with vendors of the products you use, or are planning to upgrade your airplane, interior, paint or avionics, the opportunity to confer with and compare information from vendors across the board is one of the biggest reasons I like AirVenture. 

An original Gloster Meteor came from the United Kingdom to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the RAF at AirVenture.
AirVenture offers daily airshows. The Candian Harvard Aerobatic team performed for a record-setting crowd in 2018.

 

A walk around the grounds

Passes can be purchased online (and printed at home) or on-site near the main gate. You’ll take your ticket to a booth near the main gate in exchange for a wristband. An EAA staff member will put it on for you. It’s your gate pass for the day, days or week. Once you have a wristband, there are other show entry points. (A link to a map of the AirVenture grounds is in Resources.—Ed.)

Be sure to gather your group together for a photo under the big sign that marks the entrance. From there, the show spreads out as you walk east along Celebration Way toward Boeing Plaza where the really big and significant airplanes are parked. Most of the big companies (Piper, Lycoming, Continental, etc.) exhibit on or near Celebration Way. 

Four large buildings (A, B, C and D), located halfway to Boeing Square, are where you’ll find a tight concentration of vendors. After passing through Boeing Square, you’ll arrive at Wittman Way. A left turn will take you to the Homebuilt and Warbird areas; a right turn will lead to the Vintage and Ultralight display airplanes. 

The Piper Flyer Association booth had a new location in 2018: Hangar C, Booth 3126.
BendixKing announced its new product lines and subscription plan for avionics equipment.

 

The AirVenture app

Anyone attending AirVenture will benefit greatly by downloading the AirVenture app onto a smartphone. The app lists the location of all the vendors and provides information about buses (not the Gathering bus) that run regularly to the seaplane base and stores near the site.

The app helps users distill the event into manageable portions. There’s so much to do and so much to learn that I believe it’s impossible to take it all in during one week. 

Want to learn to weld; work wood, sheet metal and composites; tear down and reassemble a Lycoming engine; catch up on no-lead 100-octane Avgas progress; learn how to grow your EAA chapter; explore an ag pilot career; learn how to efficiently lean your engine or any of a thousand other topics and subjects? 

You’ll need a roadmap so the next shiny airplane or gadget doesn’t pull you off your path. That’s where the app comes in. Select the events, vendors or demonstrations that interest you, and they’re moved to a day-by-day calendar in the app. 

The app also provides information about the free shuttles that run often to different areas on the grounds. Unless you have the endurance of a triathlete, the shuttles are a must if for nothing more than touring the different reaches of all that is AirVenture. 

The latest in…ADS-B

Foreflight and Sporty’s introduced Sentry, an ADS-B In receiver that has it all. Features include a 12-hour battery life (so there’s no need to plug into a backup battery during a long cross-country), a pressure altitude sensor, weather replay, a backup attitude source (AHARS), a carbon monoxide monitor and alarm and a built-in WAAS GPS. Every Sentry is shipped with a RAM suction cup mount and will support up to five devices on its Wi-Fi network. Price is $499.

 

The Sentry ADS-B In receiver will support up to five devices on its Wi-Fi network.
…head-up displays

Head-up displays (HUD) got a lot of attention at AirVenture, and at least three companies had HUD products on display. While I’m not an active IFR pilot, I can see how a HUD would be a real asset while flying a low IFR approach.

The Epic Optix Epic Eagle 1 connects to all major electronic flight bag (EFB) apps from either an iOS or Android phone or tablet via Wi-Fi. The Epic Eagle 1 displays a wealth of flight data, including synthetic vision, onto an infinity-focused screen that is part of the 1.6-pound unit that mounts on the airplane glareshield. The unit measures 7.8 inches by 12.8 inches by 4.7 inches. The Epic Eagle 1 was sold at AirVenture for $1,699. (Currently, it’s listed for $1,799 on the Epic Optix website.—Ed.) 

The Epic Eagle 2 connects to modern avionics equipment through both Wi-Fi and HDMI and is now set up for the Garmin G1000. The Epic Eagle 2 requires the installation of a GPU (3.7 inches by 2.8 inches by 1.5 inches). It has more capabilities and costs more than the Epic Eagle 1. The HUD is $1,999 and the GPU is $1,500. (This version is not yet listed on Epic Optix’s website.—Ed.)

According to the FAQs on the company website, approval is not needed to install or use the Epic Eagle. It is secured on the glareshield using a variety of mounts. Power (it draws less than 2 amps) is supplied through a cable to the airplane cigarette lighter. According to Epic Optix, a USB power port does not supply enough power for operation. 

Textron Aviation is listing the Epic Eagle on the options list for new Beech and Cessna aircraft. If it works at all well, it seems to be a bargain at $1,999. 

The MGF SkyDisplay HUD-LCD180 was also featured at AirVenture. The system projector is mounted to the roof of the cabin; the screen is suspended from an arm that’s connected to the projector. Information from installed avionics is fed through a display processor before being sent as video to the projector. Certification is expected in late 2018. Prices start at around $15,000.

The SkyDisplay HUD-LCD180 from MyGoFlight is expected to be certified in late 2018.

The Valkyrie HUD from Alpha System AOA is a glareshield-mounted “adjustable beam splitter” that provides a small head-up type display for either of the Alpha Systems angle-of-attack indicators. 

…com radios

I noticed a couple of new small-footprint com radios from Trig Avionics and TQ General Aviation. Both companies sell very capable coms that can be mounted in a round 2.25-inch hole—the small-sized instrument hole that’s often used for a clock. 

…electronic ignition systems

The team at Electroair announced two advances. First off, the company’s EA15000 ignition switch panel is now approved to replace all key-type magneto switches. The EA15000 can be mounted vertically or horizontally. Removal of the key switch system eliminates AD 93-05-06, a recurrent AD for certain Piper ignition switches. 

Electroair also announced it has obtained approval to install its electronic ignition system on turbocharged Lycoming engines (TIO-540, TIO-541 and TIGO-540 series) and on classic Continental engines (O-300, GO-300, E-165, E-185 and E-225).

…electronic flight instruments

Aspen Avionics introduced its low-cost building-block Evolution E5 Dual Electronic Flight Instrument (EFI), which takes the place of both the vacuum-driven artificial horizon and directional gyro instruments. The E5 Dual EFI has a backup battery to power the unit if aircraft power is lost and provides ARINC 429 and RS-232 busses that allow it to interface with some autopilots. 

In addition to a built-in air data computer and attitude heading reference system (ADAHRS), the E5 can be reconfigured and upgraded to include all the features of the Evolution 1000 Pro and further to the Pro Plus PFD, which features an angle-of-attack indicator and ADS-B and synthetic vision capabilities. Aspen also announced improvements to customers’ previously-installed Evolution flight display units. The E5 EFI is approved for installation under an STC and is priced at $4,995. 

...100-octane Avgas

Don’t expect PAFI to approve a new unleaded 100-octane Avgas soon.

The testing protocol administered by the Piston Aircraft Fuels Initiative (PAFI) was suspended in June 2018. Neither of the two candidate fuels—Shell and Swift—proved able to meet all the requirements. 

Consequently, the FAA invited other fuel providers to submit fuels. Phillips 66 and Afton Chemical announced that they had teamed up to create their version of an unleaded 100-octane Avgas. According to the presentation, the Phillips/Afton fuel will be almost identical to today’s 100LL except that a manganese additive (HiTec®3000) will be blended instead of lead. 

…Rajay turbocharger parts

If you’ve been looking for a source for new parts for your Rajay supercharger installation, look to Rajay Turbo Products. The company is also working to supply a hose kit that would terminate the repetitive five-year inspections required by AD 81-19-04.

I admit this is not a very comprehensive report, so I suggest you start saving now to get yourself to the 50th anniversary of AirVenture in 2019. I can guarantee EAA will be pulling out all the stops.

As I write this in mid-August 2018, there are only 49 weeks and one day before the show starts July 22, 2019. Attendees and show volunteers will begin arriving days and even weeks before the start date. 

At my age, I live by the rule, “The days seem long, but the years whiz by.” Now is the time to start making plans to attend AirVenture 2019. 

Steve Ells has been an A&P/IA for 44 years and is a commercial pilot with instrument and multi-engine ratings. Ells also loves utility and bush-style airplanes and operations. He’s a former tech rep and editor for Cessna Pilots Association and served as associate editor for AOPA Pilot until 2008. Ells is the owner of Ells Aviation (EllsAviation.com) and the proud owner of a 1960 Piper Comanche. He lives in Templeton, California, with his wife Audrey. Send questions and comments to .

RESOURCES >>>>>

EAA AIRVENTURE INFO

AirVenture app
Along-the-route special offers for AirVenture-bound fliers
AirVenture grounds map

THE GATHERING

Piper Flyer Association
piperflyer.org

ADS-B 

ForeFlight, LLC. (Sentry)

HEAD-UP DISPLAYS

Epic Optix (Epic Eagle 1 and 2)
MGF (SkyDisplay HUD-LCD180)
Alpha Systems AOA (Valkyrie HUD)

COM RADIOS

Trig Avionics Limited
trig-avionics.com

TQ Systems GmbH/TQ General Aviation
tq-general-aviation.com

ELECTRONIC IGNITION

Electroair
electroair.net

ELECTRONIC FLIGHT INSTRUMENTS

Aspen Avionics Inc.
aspenavionics.com

TURBOCHARGER PARTS

Talco Aviation/Rajay Turbo Products
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Papa’s Got a Brand New… Fuel

Papa’s Got a Brand New… Fuel

Swift Fuels’ 94 Octane Unleaded Avgas

Earlier this month I burned 25 gallons of Swift Fuels’ 94UL unleaded Avgas in the 180 hp Lycoming O-360 in my 1960 Piper Comanche, Papa. 

Swift Fuels of Lafayette, Ind. has submitted its 102 octane unleaded (102UL) Avgas to the FAA for testing in the Piston Aircraft Fuels Initiative (PAFI) program, but it also announced in mid-2015 that it was producing a 94 octane unleaded (94UL) Avgas. 

In the last year and a half, 94UL hasn’t gained much traction even though it’s approved for operation in a wide range of GA engine and airframes. 

94UL is produced to ASTM Standard D7547, the specification for hydrocarbon unleaded aviation gasoline. This lead-free Avgas was developed at the request of the military in 1994 for use in its drone fleet. 94UL is a stable fuel with a “tank life” of two years. 

I am looking forward to the day when Avgas will be free of tetraethyl lead (TEL), and when I saw that Swift offered a lead-free Avgas that I could legally use, I wanted to try it. What I found was very interesting.

By the end of my flight testing I hadn’t seen one iota of discernible difference in any engine parameter—EGT, CHT, manifold pressure, rpm or oil temperature—between the 94UL and 100LL Avgas. 

 

Data collection

The data I’ve captured is by no means an exhaustive test. I haven’t done an extreme heat or extreme cold temperature starting test. I haven’t done a high altitude (18,000 feet MSL) operational test. I haven’t done an in-flight restarting test. Nor have I done a fuel system compatibility test. 

But thanks to the data collection feature of my Electronics International CGR-30P and 30C engine monitor, I could collect and plot the engine data gathered during the three test flights using EGView from EG Trends. 

I also asked Joe Godrey and Savvy Analysis to check my plots. He verified my findings.

 

Preparing for the tests 

There is one 30-gallon bladder-style fuel tank in each wing of my airplane. The fuel selector valve has three positions: left to the engine, right to the engine, and off. There’s no both position. 

After flying the right tank empty and sumping the remaining unusable fuel out through the system low point drain, I paid Rabbit Aviation Services at the San Carlos Airport (KSQL) $118.37 to pump 26.6 gallons of 94UL into the right-wing tank. 

I also topped off the left tank with 8.4 gallons of 100LL ($38.22). That crunches down to 100LL at $4.55 a gallon and 94UL at $4.45. (Vendors set the pump prices; when buying from Rabbit there’s minimal direct cost savings.) The fuelers at Rabbit asked if my airplane was approved for auto gas or 94UL Avgas before dispatching the 94UL truck. 

Initial observations

94UL smells different than Avgas and is clear. I checked the two fuels for weight. The 94UL is lighter at 5.79 pounds/gallon than the 100LL at 5.94 pounds. 

I flew three one-plus hour flights, switching back and forth between the left and right tanks. 

I switched during a full power climb; I switched with the mixture leaned to peak EGT on the first cylinder to peak; and I switched during my normal cruise power and mixture settings while level at 5,500 feet MSL. I also switched on descent and while idling before flight and after landing. 

In addition to collecting the engine parameters digitally, I also watched for any EGT difference in the seconds following the switches. I never saw the numbers change.

 

Users’ reports

John Poppy at the Portage Municipal Airport (C47) in Portage, Wis., a popular fueling stop near AirVenture, said he’s heard “zero negative feedback” about 94UL. 

Poppy has a 1,000 gallon tank and says he pays two cents a gallon for shipping for the five-hour drive from the Swift production plant in Lafayette, Ind. Poppy sells 94UL for $3.35 a gallon—59 cents per gallon less than his 100LL. 

Poppy told me that one customer who flies a Cessna 182 has been using it for over a year while commuting to another state. According to Poppy, the customer’s mechanic asked if he had taken his engine apart and cleaned it after pulling the cylinders for a top overhaul. 

Rich Volker of RV Airshows burns it in the 600 hp Pratt and Whitney R-1340 that powers the Harvard Mk IV he flies in his airshow routine. Volker told me he flies his routines at full power and in his opinion, his engine can’t tell the difference. 

Dennis Wyman runs the engine shop at G&N Aircraft in Griffin, Ind. Wyman told me that his experience is that running 94UL results in less deposits on pistons and valves. In his experience, the switch between the two fuels is transparent. 

The only change Wyman has seen is that the combustion chamber of an engine that uses 94UL looks slightly darker than a 100LL chamber. Can you use 94UL?

You can use 94UL is your airplane fits into one of the following options:

• Airframe/engine combinations that have an Auto Fuel STC (e.g., an STC from Petersen Aviation);

• Airframe/engine combinations OEM-approved for auto fuel (e.g., ultralights, LSAs and experimental aircraft);

• Airframe/engine combinations Type Certificated to operate on Grade 80 (listed as Grade 80/87 in ASTM D910) or Grade UL91 (ASTM D7547) Avgas; (Note: If the fuel data plate on the engine lists 80/87 as the fuel, you can legally use 94UL without an STC. This includes Piper singles such as PA-18, -20, -22 and 150 hp PA-28s.) 

• Airframe/engine combinations Type Certificated to operate on minimum 80 octane or lower (e.g., 73 or 65 octane) Avgas; or

• Airframe/engine combinations with an Avgas STC purchased from Swift Fuels.

The engine data plate on my Lycoming O-360-A1A specifies 91/96 octane fuel, yet my Piper PA-24 Comanche had never been approved for an auto fuel STC. My only avenue to use 94UL was buying an Avgas STC from Swift. 

Where can you get 94UL?

Per the user map on the Swift Fuels website, there’s only one public source for 94UL west of the Mississippi River, and it’s in California. 

There are also 14 that are cited as “private users.” The 18 other public outlets for 94UL include three in Florida, one in South Carolina, one in Ohio, one in Missouri, four in Indiana and eight in Wisconsin. (Note: If you would like find out more about setting up a 94UL station, contact the folks at Swift. They have a team that will tell you how to get started.)

One of the potential roadblocks between availability and pumping 94UL at your airport is tankage. Most airports now have two tanks—one for jet fuel and one for 100LL. One option for adding a third is installing a box station from U-Fuel in Elk Mound, Wis. 

U-Fuel offers a split tank—94UL on one side and 100LL on the other. It appears that split models have the same footprint as existing single-fuel models. 

 

94UL is here now; PAFI fuel is a few years away

Since most privately owned and operated airplanes in the GA fleet can safely burn 94UL, and since Swift sells it for less than today’s 100LL, Swift’s 94UL seems like a winner. 

No one knows when the new unleaded 100 octane Avgas will be produced—it’s still being tested in the Piston Aviation Fuels Initiative (PAFI) program. 

The PAFI program is scheduled to complete the fuels testing in 2018, but there could well be a time lapse between the approval date and the production and delivery to your local airport. 

Based on my testing and my belief that TEL creates a wide range of problems in our air-cooled engines, I would be burning unleaded aviation fuel today if there was a pump with a Swift 94UL placard close by. 

Steve Ells has been an A&P/IA for 44 years and is a commercial pilot with instrument and multi-engine ratings. Ells also loves utility and bush-style airplanes and operations. He’s a former tech rep and editor for Cessna Pilots Association and served as associate editor for AOPA Pilot until 2008. Ells is the owner of Ells Aviation (EllsAviation.com) and the proud owner of a 1960 Piper Comanche. He lives in Templeton, Calif. with his wife Audrey. Send questions and comments to

RESOURCES >>>>>

Engine monitors and cluster gauge replacements
Electronics International – PFA supporter

 

EGView software – data analysis tool
EG Trends Inc.

 

Engine rebuilding, engine overhaul and engine sales
G&N Aircraft, Inc.

 

Auto fuel STCs
Petersen Aviation, Inc.

 

94UL fuel service (West Coast)
Rabbit Aviation Services, Inc.

 

Savvy Analysis – engine monitor data organizer
Savvy Aircraft Maintenance Management, Inc.

 

94 octane unleaded Avgas, Avgas STC
Swift Fuels

 

Aviation fuel stations
U-Fuel 

  

Further reading
FAA PAFI program
Read more...
Superior Air Parts Educational Forums at Aeroshell Oshkosh 2018 Forum Series

Superior Air Parts Educational Forums at Aeroshell Oshkosh 2018 Forum Series

Superior’s V.P. product support, Bill Ross (A&P/IA) will present two forums: Owner’s Guide to Engine Operations and Maintenance, and Engine Leaning Made Simple at the AeroShell Tent (#450) during Oshkosh/AirVenture 2018.

Coppell, TX (June 25, 2018)  — Scott Hayes, vice president, sales and marketing for Superior Air Parts, Inc., announced today that the company has accepted an invitation to be a presenter during the new AeroShell Forum series during Oshkosh AirVenture 2018.

AeroShell will host a series of forums on topics ranging from engine care to unleaded avgas. Follow them on Twitter @Shell_Aviation or visit the EAA Oshkosh AirVenture 2018 Schedule of Events at https://www.eaa.org/en/airventure/eaa-airventure-schedule-of-events for updates.

Superior’s vice president of Product Support, Bill Ross, who has been an FAA A&P/IA for 33-years, will present two educational forums. Ross will present “Owner’s Guide to Engine Operations and Maintenance” on Tuesday, July 24, and “Engine Leaning Made Simple on Friday, July 27.” 

Both presentations will begin at 1:00 and be held at the AeroShell tent (#450), which is directly across from the AOPA exhibit.

“Superior Air Parts is extremely excited to be a part of the AeroShell Oshkosh Forum series,” Hayes said. “Helping pilots save money has been our philosophy for over 50 years and educating pilots on the many ways they can more efficiently operate their engines has proven to be a very effective way to do that.” 

Hayes also said that along with the two forums at the AeroShell tent, Ross will also be hosting the Superior Air Parts Oshkosh Forums. The free, 45-minute Forum sessions will be held daily at the Superior Air Parts tent (#257), which is just north of Hangar B. Forum times are 9:3011:00 and 12:30, Monday, July 23rd through Saturday, July 28th.  

In addition to all the other valuable information, all forum attendees will receive a free digital copy of Bill Ross’ popular 144-page book, “Engine Management 101.”

For more information and complete forum schedule, visit: http://superiorairparts.com/about-us/event/oshkoshforums2018/

About Superior Air Parts, Inc.

Superior Air Parts, Inc., is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Superior Aviation Group. Founded in 1967, Superior Air Parts is the leading manufacturer of FAA approved aftermarket replacement parts for Lycoming and Continental aircraft engines. In addition, the company manufactures the FAA certified Vantage Engine and the XP-Series Engine family for experimental and sport aircraft builders. For more information, visit: www.superiorairparts.com

Contact:

Dale Smith

Media Relations Representative 

Superior Air Parts, Inc.

904.400.1000

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