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PA-24 Comanche

PA-24 Comanche (6)

The PA-24 Comanche is a four-seat, low-wing, all-metal, light aircraft of monocoque construction with retractable landing gear.

Comanche 180

The original version of the Comanche was the PA-24, which featured a carbureted 180 hp (134 kW) Lycoming O-360-A1A engine, swept tail, laminar flow airfoil, and all-flying stabilator.

Comanche 250

In 1958 Piper introduced the PA-24-250, a 250 horsepower (186 kW) version using a Lycoming O-540 engine.

Comanche 260

In 1965 the first of four 260 horsepower (194 kW) versions of the Comanche was introduced. They were:

  • PA-24-260 (1965)
  • PA-24-260B (1966 to 1968)
  • PA-24-260C (1969 to 1972)
  • PA-24-260TC

Comanche 400

The PA-24-400 Comanche 400,while identical to other single-engined Comanches, it is structurally strengthened, primarily in the tail. The aircraft has an extra nose rib in the stabilator and in the vertical fin. 

Twin Comanche

The Piper PA-30 Twin Comanche is a twin-engined cabin monoplane. It is the twin-engine development of the PA-24 Comanche single-engine aircraft.

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PA-28 Cherokee

PA-28 Cherokee (16)

PA-28-140 Cherokee Cruiser

Two place, fixed landing gear landplane, Lycoming O-320-E2A engine of 150 hp (112 kW), gross weight 1,950 lb (885 kg). First certified on 14 February 1964. Approved as a 2,150 lb (975 kg) gross weight four place aircraft on 17 June 1965.

PA-28-150 Cherokee

Four place, fixed landing gear landplane, Lycoming O-320-A2B or O-320-E2A engine of 150 hp (112 kW), gross weight 2,150 lb (975 kg). First certified on 2 June 1961.

PA-28-151 Cherokee Warrior

Four place, fixed landing gear landplane, Lycoming O-320-E3D engine of 150 hp (112 kW), gross weight 2,325 lb (1,055 kg). First certified on 9 August 1973. Changes from the PA-28-150 include a tapered wing.

PA-28-160 Cherokee

Four place, fixed landing gear landplane, Lycoming O-320-B2B or O-320-D2A engine of 160 hp (119 kW), gross weight 2,200 lb (998 kg). First certified on 31 October 1960.

  PA-28-161 Warrior II

Four place, fixed landing gear landplane, Lycoming O-320-D3G or O-320-D2A engine of 160 hp (119 kW), gross weight 2,325 lb (1,055 kg). First certified on 2 November 1976. Changes from the PA-28-160 include a tapered wing. Certified on 1 July 1982 for gross weight of 2,440 lb (1,107 kg).

PA-28-161 Warrior III

Four place, fixed landing gear landplane, Lycoming O-320-D3G engine of 160 hp (119 kW), gross weight 2,440 lb (1,107 kg). First certified on 1 July 1994.

PA-28-180 Cherokee

Four place, fixed landing gear landplane, Lycoming O-360-A3A or O-360-A4A engine of 180 hp (134 kW), gross weight 2,400 lb (1,089 kg). First certified on 3 August 1962.

PA-28-180 Archer

Four place, fixed landing gear landplane, Lycoming O-360-A4A or O-360-A4M engine of 180 hp (134 kW), gross weight 2,450 lb (1,111 kg). First certified on 22 May 1972. Changes from the PA-28-180 Cherokee include a five inch fuselage extension, wing span increase, larger horizontal tail, gross weight increase and other minor changes.

PA-28-181 Archer II

Four place, fixed landing gear landplane, Lycoming O-360-A4M or O-360-A4A engine of 180 hp (134 kW), gross weight 2,550 lb (1,157 kg). First certified on 8 July 1975. Changes from the PA-28-180 include a tapered wing.

 

PA-28-181 Archer III

Four place, fixed landing gear landplane, Lycoming O-360-A4M engine of 180 hp (134 kW), gross weight 2,550 lb (1,157 kg). First certified on 30 August 1994.

 

PA-28-201T Turbo Dakota

Four place, fixed landing gear landplane, turbocharged Continental TSIO-360-FB, engine of 200 hp (149 kW), gross weight 2,900 lb (1,315 kg). First certified on 14 December 1978.

  PA-28-235 Cherokee Pathfinder

Four place, fixed landing gear landplane, Lycoming O-540-B2B5, O-540-B1B5, or O-540-B4B5 engine of 235 hp (175 kW), gross weight 2,900 lb (1,315 kg). First certified on 15 July 1963.

PA-28-235 Cherokee Pathfinder

Four place, fixed landing gear landplane, Lycoming O-540-B4B5 engine of 235 hp (175 kW), gross weight 3,000 lb (1,361 kg). First certified on 9 June 1972. Changes from the 1963 certified PA-28-235 Cherokee Pathfinder include a five inch fuselage extension, wing span increase, larger horizontal tail, gross weight increase and other minor changes.

 

PA-28-236 Dakota

Four place, fixed landing gear landplane, Lycoming O-540-J3A5D engine of 235 hp (175 kW), gross weight 3,000 lb (1,361 kg). First certified on 1 June 1978. Changes from the 1972 certified PA-28-235 Cherokee Pathfinder include tapered wing.

 

PA-28S-160 Cherokee

Four place, fixed landing gear seaplane, Lycoming O-320-D2A engine of 160 hp (119 kW), gross weight 2,140 lb (971 kg). First certified on 25 February 1963.

PA-28S-180 Cherokee

Four place, fixed landing gear seaplane, Lycoming O-360-A3A or O-360-A4A engine of 180 hp (134 kW), gross weight 2,222 lb (1,008 kg). First certified on 10 May 1963.

PA-28R-180 Arrow

Four place, retractable landing gear landplane, Lycoming IO-360-B1E engine of 180 hp (134 kW), gross weight 2,500 lb (1,134 kg). First certified on 8 June 1967.

PA-28R-200 Arrow

Four place, retractable landing gear landplane, Lycoming IO-360-C1C engine of 200 hp (149 kW), gross weight 2,600 lb (1,179 kg). First certified on 16 January 1969.

PA-28R-200 Arrow II

Four place, retractable landing gear landplane, Lycoming IO-360-C1C or C1C6 engine of 200 hp (149 kW), gross weight 2,650 lb (1,202 kg). First certified on 2 December 1971. Changes from the 1969 certified PA-28R-200 Arrow include a five inch fuselage extension, wing span increase, larger horizontal tail, gross weight increase and other minor changes.

PA-28R-201 Arrow III

Four place, retractable landing gear landplane, Lycoming IO-360-C1C6 engine of 200 hp (149 kW), gross weight 2,750 lb (1,247 kg). First certified on 2 November 1976.

PA-28R-201T Turbo Arrow III

Four place, retractable landing gear landplane, turbocharged Continental TSIO-360-F or TSIO-360-FB engine of 200 hp (149 kW), gross weight 2,900 lb (1,315 kg). First certified on 2 November 1976.

PA-28RT-201 Arrow IV

Four place, retractable landing gear landplane, Lycoming IO-360-C1C6 engine of 200 hp (149 kW), gross weight 2,750 lb (1,247 kg). First certified on 13 November 1978. Features a T tail.

PA-28RT-201T Turbo Arrow IV

Four place, retractable landing gear landplane, turbocharged Continental TSIO-360-FB engine of 200 hp (149 kW), gross weight 2,900 lb (1,315 kg). First certified on 13 November 1978. Features a T tail.

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PA-32 Cherokee Six/Lance/Saratoga

PA-32 Cherokee Six/Lance/Saratoga (4)

The Piper PA-32R is a six-seat, high-performance, single engine, all-metal fixed-wing aircraft.

PA-32R-300 (1976–1978) 

Marketed as the Piper Cherokee Lance. Initial version of the retractable PA-32 line, with a standard tail in the 1976 model.The 1977 and 1978 models featured a tail modified to a "T" design with the stabilator (horizontal stabilizer/elevator) moved to the top of the vertical tail.

This design placed the stabilator outside of the prop wash compared with the low tail design, and appreciably affected the takeoff and landing characteristics. 

PA-32RT-300 (1978–1979) 

Beginning with this model, the Cherokee name was officially dropped and the model was designated the Lance II. The "T"-tail arrangement was continued on the Lance II. 

PA-32RT-300T (1978–1979)  

Also in 1978 a turbocharged version, designated the Turbo Lance II, was introduced.The Turbo Lance II has a service ceiling of 20,000 ft with a rate of climb of 1050 ft/min. It can cruise at 10,000 ft at 175 kt true airspeed at 75% power burning 20 gal/h. Fuel capacity is 94 usable gallons. 

PA-32R-301 (1980–2007) 

The 1980 models reverted to a standard tail design, and were designated as the Saratoga SP.In 1993 the airplane received several cosmetic and systems updates and was redesignated as the Saratoga II HP

PA-32R-301T (1980–2009) 

The 1980 Turbocharged model was given the name Turbo Saratoga SP. The name and model designation stayed the same through the 1996 model year, despite several updates to the airplane during that time. Starting with the 1997 model year the airplane received a new designation, the Saratoga II TC, and a new Lycoming TIO-540-AH1A engine. Externally the biggest difference was the new cowl, with much smaller, round air inlets. 1997-1998 Saratoga II TC's featured a King avionics suite, which was switched to dual Garmin GNS-430's and a GTX-320 transponder with the 1999 models. In mid-2000 model year the avionics were again updated, with one Garmin GNS-430 and one GNS-530 and a GTX-327 transponder as standard equipment. Beginning in 2004 the Saratoga models were available with an Avidyne Entegra "Glass Panel" avionics system, which was replaced by the Garmin G1000 in 2007. 

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PA-38 Tomahawk

PA-38 Tomahawk (3)

PA-38 Tomahawk

The Piper PA-38-112 Tomahawk is a two-seat, fixed tricycle gear general aviation airplane, originally designed for flight training, touring and personal use.

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Piper Cub: J-3/J-4/J-5

Piper Cub: J-3/J-4/J-5 (6)

E2 Cub

The Taylor E2 Cub was a two-seat tandem low powered aircraft with a high-wing and fabric covered tubular steel fuselage, fabric covered wooden wings and open cockpit. It was produced from 1930-1936.

J-2 Cub

The Taylor J-2 Cub (later also known as the Piper J-2 Cub) is an American two-seat light aircraft that was designed and built by the Taylor Aircraft Company. was produced from 1936-1938

J-3 Cub

The Piper J-3 Cub is a small, simple, light aircraft with tandem (fore and aft) seating. It was intended for flight training but became one of the most popular and best-known light aircraft of all time. It was produced from 1937-1947.

J-4 Cub Coupe

The Piper J-4 Cub Coupe is a two place side-by-side version of the Piper J-3. It was Piper's first model with side-by-side seating; combined with docile low-speed handling, this made it a good trainer. It was built between 1938-1942.

J-5 Cub Cruiser

The Piper J-5 Cub Cruiser was a larger, more powerful version of the basic Piper J-3 Cub. It was designed just two years after the J-3 Cub, and differed by having a wider fuselage with the pilot sitting in the front seat and two passengers sitting in the rear seat. Equipped with a a 75-hp Continental engine the plane's cruising speed was 75 mph. Though officially a three-seater, it would be more accurately described as a "two-and-a-half-seater", as two adults would find themselves quite cramped in wider rear seat.It was produced from 1940-1946.

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Piper M Series

Piper M Series (2)

The Piper PA-46 is a family of light aircraft. The aircraft is powered by a single engine and has the capacity for one pilot and five passengers.

PA-46-310P Malibu

The PA-46-310P is powered by a Teledyne Continental Motors TSIO-520BE engine rated at 310 hp (230 kW). The PA-46-310P has lower fuel consumption, greater range, and the ability to cruise at "lean-of-peak." The PA-46-310P has a maximum cruising range of 1,550 nautical miles (with reserves).

PA-46-350P Mirage

The PA-46-350P includes a more powerful Textron Lycoming TIO-540-AE2A 350 hp (260 kW) engine and a new wing.

PA-46-500TP Meridian

The PA-46-500TP is a turboprop-powered version of the Malibu powered by a Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-42A of 500 shp (370 kW). Some of the changes made to allow for turboprop power include larger wings and tail surfaces.

PA-46R-350T Matrix

The PA-46R-350T is an unpressurized version of the Mirage. The new model has been designated as the PA-46R-350T, indicating retractable landing gear, 350 horsepower (260 kW), and turbocharging. The Matrix's powerplant is a turbocharged Lycoming TI0-540-AE2A producing 350 hp (260 KW).

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Piper PA-11, PA-12, PA-14

Piper PA-11, PA-12, PA-14 (3)

PA-11 Cub Special

The Piper PA-11 Cub Special was a later production, two-place variant of the Piper J-3 Cub light propeller-driven aircraft. It was produced from 1947-1949.

Piper PA-14 Family Cruiser

The Piper PA-14 Family Cruiser is an American-built small touring aircraft of the late 1940s. It was produced from 1947-1949. 

Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser

The Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser is an American three-seat, high wing, single engine conventional landing gear-equipped light aircraft. It was built between 1946-1948.

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Piper PA-18 Super Cub

Piper PA-18 Super Cub (4)

The Piper PA-18 Super Cub is a two-seat, single-engine monoplane introduced in 1949. It was developed from the Piper PA-11, and traces its lineage back through the J-3 to the Taylor E-2 Cub of the 1930s. In close to 40 years of production, over 9,000 were built. Super Cubs are commonly found in roles such as bush flying, banner and glider towing. It was built between 1949-1983 and 1988-1994.

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Piper PA-25 Pawnees

Piper PA-25 Pawnees (1)

The PA-25 Pawnee was an agricultural aircraft. It remains a widely used aircraft in agricultural spraying and is also used as a tow plane, or tug, for launching gliders or for towing banners. It was produced from 1959 to 1982

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Short Wing Pipers

Short Wing Pipers (5)

The Piper PA-15 Vagabond and PA-17 Vagabond are both two seat, high wing, conventional gear light aircraft that were designed for personal use and for flight training.

PA-15 Vagabond

Side-by-side two-seater powered by one 65hp Lycoming O-145 engine.

PA-17 Vagabond

Also known as the Vagabond Trainer a variant of the PA-15 with dual-controls, shock-cord suspension and powered by one 65hp Continental A-65-8 engine.

The PA-16 Clipper is a stretched and refined version of the Vagabond intended to seat four people. It is equipped with an extra wing tank, added doors to accommodate the new seating, and a Lycoming O-235.

The PA-20 Pacer and PA-22 Tri-Pacer are a family of four-place, strut braced, high-wing light aircraft that were built by Piper Aircraft. The PA-20 and PA-22 were produced from 1950-1954 and 1950-1964, respectively.

PA-20

Four-seat, conventional landing gear, light cabin aircraft, powered by a 125 hp (93 kW) Lycoming O-290-D engine. Certified 21 December 1949.

PA-20S

Three-seat, conventional landing gear, light cabin aircraft, with optional float installation, powered by a 125 hp (93 kW) Lycoming O-290-D engine. Certified 18 May 1950.

PA-20 115

Four-seat, conventional landing gear, light cabin aircraft, powered by a 115 hp (86 kW) Lycoming O-235-C1 engine. Certified 22 March 1950.

PA-20S 115

Three-seat, conventional landing gear, light cabin aircraft, with optional float installation, powered by a 115 hp (86 kW) Lycoming O-235-C1 engine. Certified 18 May 1950.

PA-20 135

Four-seat, conventional landing gear, light cabin aircraft, powered by a 135 hp (101 kW) Lycoming O-290-D2 engine. Certified 5 May 1952.

PA-20S 135

Three-seat, conventional landing gear, light cabin aircraft, with optional float installation, powered by a 135 hp (101 kW) Lycoming O-290-D2 engine. Certified 15 May 1952.

PA-22

Four-seat, tricycle landing gear, light cabin aircraft, powered by a 125 hp (93 kW) Lycoming O-290-D engine. Certified 20 December 1950.

PA-22-108 Colt

Two-seat, tricycle landing gear, light cabin aircraft, powered by a 108 hp (81 kW) Lycoming O-235-C1 or C1B engine. Certified 21 October 1960.

PA-22-135

Four-seat, tricycle landing gear, light cabin aircraft, powered by a 135 hp (101 kW) Lycoming O-290-D2 engine. Certified 5 May 1952.

PA-22S-135Three-seat, tricycle landing gear, light cabin aircraft, with optional float installation, powered by a 135 hp (101 kW) Lycoming O-290-D2 engine. Certified 14 May 1954.

PA-22-150

Two or four-seat, tricycle landing gear, light cabin aircraft, powered by a 150 hp (112 kW) Lycoming O-320-A2A or A2B engine. Certified 3 September 1952 as a four place in the normal category and 24 May 1957 as a two place in the utility category.

PA-22S-150

Three-seat, tricycle landing gear, light cabin aircraft, with optional float installation, powered by a 150 hp (112 kW) Lycoming O-320-A2A or A2B engine. Certified 3 September 1954.

PA-22-160

Two or four-seat, tricycle landing gear, light cabin aircraft, powered by a 160 hp (119 kW) Lycoming O-320-B2A or B2B engine. Certified 3 September 1952 as a four place in the normal category and as a two place in the utility category.

PA-22S-160

Three-seat, tricycle landing gear, light cabin aircraft, with optional float installation, powered by a 160 hp (119 kW) Lycoming O-320-B2A or B2B engine. Certified 25 October 1957.

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A Cherokee with a Caribbean Soul

A Cherokee with a Caribbean Soul

I was first bitten by the flying bug at an airshow in Dayton, Ohio when I was five years old. The noise from the jets was incredible. My dad took me, and we were able to walk right up to a B-52 (which in those days was still guarded by Air Force personnel). We checked it out from nose to tail. My dad said we needed to kick the tires if we were interested in buying it. I remember the tire was taller than I was, but I gave it such a kick I landed on my butt, which had my dad and the guard laughing out loud.
I knew even then I wanted to fly. My nearsightedness was just bad enough; I couldn’t fly for the Air Force. And I couldn’t afford to take lessons, so I put my dreams on hold.  When I turned 21, I bought a great book called “Learning How to Fly an Airplane” by Jerry McGuire and Emily Howell Warner, and I read it again and again. It was 11 years before time, money and a nearby airport all aligned to afford me my dream of getting my pilot’s license.

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Piper Cub and the Reed Clipped Wing Conversion

In the early 1930s businessman William T. Piper became involved with the Taylor Aircraft Company. C.G. Taylor designed a light aircraft with steel framework, tubular struts, rubber shock cord landing gear and wood wings with spruce spars. The first production Cub, called the E-2, was soon flying with the A-40…
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Power for the Cub

February 2005- Piper's ubiquitous Cub—from the humble J-2 through the PA-18 and all the variants in between—has always been known as a design that could be successful when equipped with virtually any powerplant that happened to be available.Unfortunately, in its early days there were not that many reliable engines from…
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Piper PA-16 Clipper

The PA-16 Clipper is a stretched and refined version of the Vagabond intended to seat four people. It is equipped with an extra wing tank, added doors to accommodate the new seating, and a Lycoming O-235.

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The Ranch Hand Super Cub

The Ranch Hand Super Cub

Bryan Prevost’s good-looking PA-18 has flown four generations of one family around the grasslands of eastern Montana. 

Unless you grew up in a residential airpark, or maybe in Alaska, you probably didn’t have an airplane hangered in your backyard. But Bryan Prevost did. 

In places like Lambert, Montana, where the Prevosts have a farm and ranch, an aircraft can be as useful as a tractor or a horse—perhaps even more so. With a population of 483 in the settlement and a population density of one person per square mile in the vicinity, there’s some serious territory to cover. 

“My dad purchased the Super Cub that we have today back in 1976 from the North Dakota Game and Fish Dept.,” Bryan said. The Super Cub had seen a lot of flying before the Prevost family acquired it—and it’s seen a lot since.

Growing up in the backseat

“Growing up with a plane, it was like having another vehicle for us,” explained Prevost. “I’m the third-generation aviator in the family. My grandfather and my father were both pilots. My grandfather Joe flew a Waco, a Luscombe, and was the crew chief on the P-51 and P-38 back in World War II.” 

Prevost’s grandfather was part of the 55th Fighter Group and 442nd Air Service Group. Much of Joe Prevost’s deployment was spent in England, and he returned home with a Bronze Star for his service.

Bryan’s father, John, loved to fly the Super Cub. “I can remember as a kid hearing the plane start up in the morning,” Bryan said. “I always made a mad dash to get to the plane when my dad was getting ready to go flying. I guess it was a good way to get me out of bed,” he joked. 

“Every time that plane started up, I was in the backseat. And when I couldn’t go, I was bummed. My mom has a home video of me at age 5 coming out of the Super Cub after a flight. In the video, I’m crying—because I didn’t want to stop flying.”

“My dad taught me the basics of flying that plane,” he continued. “As I got older, I would actually go out to the plane when my dad was gone and start it up and taxi it around—the only problem was, I couldn’t push it back in the hangar,” he admitted. “My dad was not happy. He said, ‘You need to take lessons.’” 

Father and son spent many hours together in the Super Cub. Unfortunately, Bryan Prevost lost his dad suddenly in 2011. John was only 60 years old. “I think we flew together the week before that,” he recalled. “Dad flew.”

 A circuitous path to piloting

“I began flying lessons at 16 or 17,” Bryan explained, “but I just didn’t have the time. I was involved in sports in high school, and it took a lot of my free time.”

When it came time to consider post-high school education, Bryan considered aviation. He went to his high school guidance counselor to talk about attending the University of North Dakota (UND). 

“I struggled in high school with math and science,” Bryan said, “and when I mentioned to the guidance counselor that I was really interested in aviation, he said that there’s a lot of math and science in aviation, so he would advise me not to go into aviation.”

“And I listened to him.”

“I pursued becoming a teacher,” Bryan said. But his heart wasn’t in it. “After three years of college, I decided to come back to work with my dad on the farm.” 

“Then on my 21st birthday, my parents bought me a one-hour aerobatic ride over in Minot, North Dakota at Pietsch Flying Service. I remember when Eric Haagenson rolled the Pitts S2B over, I just said to myself, ‘This is what I want to do!’”

That first logged lesson in a Pitts Special did the trick for Bryan Prevost. He attained his private pilot certificate in 1995, but the training setup wasn’t ideal. 

He explained, “My private pilot training took a while; a little over a year. It was expensive—and difficult to coordinate with the instructor, who also had a full-time job. So I decided to go back to school to get the ratings I wanted.” 

Bryan received an aeronautical science degree in aviation from Rocky Mountain College in Billings, Montana in 2000. With the previous college credits, the program took him about two years. When he graduated he was a private pilot-instrument, commercial, multi-engine and is a CFI and CFII. 

The classes were difficult, but not impossible and Bryan learned an important life lesson. “When someone tells you that you shouldn’t do something, you should go for your goals no matter how big they are,” he said. 

Prevost has about 2,000 hours now. He flew some game surveys for Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (FWP) in the early 2000s and has done a little bit of instruction. These days he primarily works on the farm and ranch, as he took on those duties full-time after his dad’s passing.

PA-18 Super Cub Photo: Moose Peterson

PA-18-135, N3689A 

The Prevosts’ Super Cub is a 1953 model. “Before my dad purchased the plane from North Dakota Game and Fish, it was a sprayer down in Pierre, South Dakota,” Bryan explained. 

“We had a total rebuild back in 2005 from a gentleman named Wayne Mackey. He did a fantastic job,” Bryan said. 

At that time, the aircraft received a new fuselage—the original one was completely shot—and all new fabric. The original fuselage had 8,500 hours; the new one has about 500 hours. 

“We went with a red-and-white color scheme. I don’t necessarily want the plane to stand out,” he explained.

“During this time I took the engine to Jeff Skyberg in Circle, Montana. Jeff and Ly-Con Aircraft did their magic: it’s a 160 hp Lycoming O-320-B2B that now puts out almost 180 hp,” Bryan said.

Other features include ThrustLine’s engine mount extension, a Sutton exhaust conversion and Micro Aerodynamics vortex generators. Regarding the new thrust line angle, “I think it does help,” Bryan said. “I also have the CubCrafters’ elevator and rudder gap seals, upgraded seats made by Oregon Aero and a Reiff engine preheater.”

In addition, N3689A was outfitted with landing gear safety cables and an extended baggage kit from F. Atlee Dodge; a Cleveland wheel and brake conversion; an 82-inch McCauley “borer” prop (GM8244) and 29-inch backcountry tires from Alaskan Bushwheels. “I absolutely love these tires,” he said. 

They suit his backcountry flying well. “I don’t hardly land anywhere but turf. I probably fly four or five times a week and just land in the middle of the pasture to check on cattle. I’ll bet I touch down on asphalt about 5 percent of the time—mainly when I need to get fuel, is all.”

“As far as avionics, it’s just the basic intercom and com radio with a Garmin GPS,” Bryan explained. “In the winter, with the weather here in Montana, we don’t fly the Cub too much—mainly because the heater isn’t so good.” 

Safety is foremost for Bryan Prevost. “I respect the weather 100 percent,” he emphasized. “Dad and I once got caught in a windstorm and it got really bad, really quick.”

Jeff Skyberg at Circle Aviation performs the annual inspections and maintenance on the aircraft. “I’ve known him for 25 years—he’s very knowledgeable,” Bryan explained. Circle Aviation is the FBO at Circle Town County Airport (4U6) in Circle, Montana.

Achievements

Prevost likes to share his love of aviation, too. He helped coordinate the Wings of Freedom airshow in Sidney, Montana in 2004, 2009, 2013 and 2016 and seems to have a knack for persuading talent to come to Montana. 

In addition to bringing the Canadian Forces Snowbirds to perform in Sidney—three times!—he also booked Danny Clisham, “The Skytalker,” as announcer for the show. “He’s the best there is,” Bryan said, “and it was great for our audience of mainly non-flyers to have an expert.”

It seems the goodwill Bryan Prevost extends comes back to him. “The highlight of my aviation journey—hands-down—is when I was invited to fly with the Canadian Forces jet demonstration team in 2013. The Snowbirds brought to me a whole new concept of close flying.”

“The one thing that stood out is their skilled teamwork—the ground crew, pilots, everyone associated with the flight—it was unbelievable. I was so honored and privileged to be able to fly with the Snowbirds.”

“I’ve been very lucky to be able to get a couple rides from Warren Pietsch in a P-51 Mustang, and also log some AT-6 time as well,” he added.

Prevost Family PA-18 Super Cub (Photo: Moose Peterson)

A family of friends and mentors

Bryan Prevost was inspired to take flight by his grandfather, his father—and episodes of “Black Sheep Squadron” on television. Today Bryan is inspired by the work of the Texas Flying Legends Museum and all of his many mentors. 

“You’ve gotta have mentors. I truly believe that,” he said. Some of the mentors that Bryan mentioned include Kent and Warren Pietsch in Minot, North Dakota and Jim Peitz in Pierre, South Dakota. “Jim said something one time that has stuck with me,” Bryan explained. “He said, ‘Your heroes become your friends.’ That sure has been true for me.”

The photography on these pages was done by Moose Peterson. “Moose takes a lot of photos for the Texas Flying Legends,” Bryan said. “Brian Strum was the pilot in the 182RG, with Moose doing the photos. I was flying the Super Cub, with Warren Pietsch as my safety pilot.” 

The fourth generation takes flight in the PA-18 Super Cub (Photo: Moose Peterson)

Like having another family member

It sounds like Bryan will never let go of the Super Cub. “We are very fortunate—still are—to have a hangar and the Cub. “It’s like a family member now,” he said.  “Ideally, I would like my kids to keep the Cub in the family,” he said. 

Bryan and his wife, Cassie, have two young children: Ryder, age 5, and Natalie, 3. And it sounds as if the next generation will be growing up in the plane, just as Bryan and his sisters did. “Last year me and my son went up, marking the fourth generation that has flown in that plane. It was a proud moment for sure.” He plans to take Natalie for her first flight soon.

Although Bryan also owns and flies a Beech Bonanza V35B, it doesn’t have quite the same charm as the Super Cub. “If I had a chance to pick any airplane, I’d still pick the Cub,” he said. 

PA-18 Super Cub

Photo by Moose Peterson

 

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STCs and Modifications 

– PFA Supporters

 

CLEVELAND WHEEL AND BRAKE CONVERSION KIT
Parker Hannifin
  
VORTEX GENERATORS
Micro AeroDynamics Inc.
 
MCCAULEY GMA8244 PROPELLER 
Univair Aircraft Corp.
 
Other STCs and Modifications
 
ALASKAN BUSHWHEELS
Airframes Alaska
 
ELEVATOR AND RUDDER GAP SEALS
CubCrafters, Inc.
 
EXTENDED BAGGAGE KIT, SAFETY CABLES
F. Atlee Dodge Aircraft Services, LLC
 
ENGINE OVERHAUL/SERVICING
Circle Aviation
406-485-2481
 
Ly-Con Rebuilding Co.
 
ENGINE PREHEATER
Reiff Corp.
 
SEAT UPGRADE
Oregon Aero
 
SUTTON EXHAUST CONVERSION
Professional Pilots, Inc.
 
THRUSTLINE ENGINE MOUNT
ThrustLine Products of Alaska LLC
Originally appeared in Piper Flyer magazine March 2018
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Piper Arrow: Hitting the Mark for 46 Years

Piper Arrow: Hitting the Mark for 46 Years

June 2013

It’s 1967 and you want to buy a new single-engine retractable. What are your options? Beech, Cessna, Mooney and Piper all have offerings, but you’re a loyal Piper flyer and want to stick with the brand. That still leaves you with two alternatives: the PA-24 Comanche and the newly introduced PA-28R-180 Cherokee Arrow.

The Comanche is fast and sleek. The Cherokee Arrow looks like and flies like—well, a Cherokee—which is not necessarily a bad thing, but here’s the clincher: the Arrow’s base price is just $16,900. The Comanche is groovy, but its $30,000-plus price tag is a bit of a bummer. Besides, the Arrow has that rad landing gear system.

The Arrow project began in 1964 as the Cherokee 180 C “Special.” Work focused initially on finding the right engine and nosewheel combination. The Lycoming O-360 was chosen originally and paired with various nosegear retraction systems, but none were suitable.

Eventually the fuel-injected IO-360 was chosen as it allowed room under the engine for gear retraction. It was necessary, however to reduce the nosewheel size to 500 x 5 inches to get the gear to fit.

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The World's Nicest Tomahawk

The World's Nicest Tomahawk

January 2015-

When I was a student pilot, I wasn't much of a Tomahawk fan. The aircraft had a reputation for being difficult to fly well. Years later, one of my students bought one—and I got to fly the little Piper for the purpose it was intended. That's when my opinion changed for the better.

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Cub on Floats

Cub on Floats

05-13 Flying Mr. Piper’s 1930s classic off water may seem straightforward to tailwheel pilots, but has some novel hazards. Photos: Keith Wilson The J-3 is an amazingly versatile little airplane that taught thousands of servicemen to fly in World War II, so it’s no surprise to find that it makes…
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Piper PA-32R Lance/Saratoga

The Piper PA-32R is a six-seat, high-performance, single engine, all-metal fixed-wing aircraft.

PA-32R-300 (1976–1978)
Marketed as the Piper Cherokee Lance. Initial version of the retractable PA-32 line, with a standard tail in the 1976 model.The 1977 and 1978 models featured a tail modified to a "T" design with the stabilator (horizontal stabilizer/elevator) moved to the top of the vertical tail.This design placed the stabilator outside of the prop wash compared with the low tail design, and appreciably affected the takeoff and landing characteristics.
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Piper PA-20 Pacer

The PA-20 Pacer and PA-22 Tri-Pacer are a family of four-place, strut braced, high-wing light aircraft that were built by Piper Aircraft. The PA-20 and PA-22 were produced from 1950-1954 and 1950-1964, respectively.
 
PA-20
Four-seat, conventional landing gear, light cabin aircraft, powered by a 125 hp (93 kW) Lycoming O-290-D engine. Certified 21 December 1949
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