Piper Flyer Association - Technical Know-how, Serious Fun read more

A Timeless Tri Pacer

A Timeless Tri Pacer

When it comes to PA-22 rebuilds, there are good Tri-Pacers and there are great Tri-Pacers. This is the story of an exceptional “truly better than the day it was built” Tri-Pacer.

The one thing I like most about attending events like Sun ‘n Fun and EAA AirVenture Oshkosh is the opportunity to just wander around and look at airplanes. Walking the grounds with the sun barely up and the dew still dripping from wings, I sometimes am lucky enough to come across an airplane with a story that just has to be told.

Such was the case when I happened upon my friend Darin Hart, owner of American Legend Aircraft Co., on a sunny Wednesday morning at Sun ‘n Fun. He was busily wiping Lakeland, Florida’s “liquid sunshine” off the most amazing-looking Piper PA-22 Tri-Pacer that I have ever seen. It was like stepping back some 60 years to a spring morning in Lock Haven, just after the pristine PA-22 rolled off the assembly line. 

“This is without a doubt the nicest Tri-Pacer in the world,” Hart said. “And it’s not just because we rebuilt it. It’s as close to brand-new as you’re ever going to find. And it should be, considering the owner spent nearly $250,000 on it.”

While Darin had me at “the nicest Tri-Pacer in the world,” the thought that the owner had spent nearly $250,000 having it rebuilt meant this was a story to share.

 

You can’t put a price on love

“A lot of people say I’m nuts and that I’ll never get my money back,” explained the Tri-Pacer’s proud owner, Mark Wyant. “But I’m OK with that. That’s not what this is all about. This is not just any airplane to me. It represents a lot of great memories and a very special part of my life.”

Bringing back great memories and paying homage to his father are the two reasons why Wyant began the project to rebuild his beloved Tri-Pacer in the first place. 

 

 

To understand how we got where we are today, we have to go back to 1974, when Wyant was an eighth-grader in Dallas.

“When you’re going to school in Garland, Texas, if you don’t play football, there’s not much left for you to do. I was too skinny for football, so I spent a lot of time reading,” Wyant said. “I got a copy of  ‘Anyone Can Fly’ by Jules Bergman, and I was hooked. I read that book three or four times.”

“It was all about Bergman learning to fly in a Piper Tri-Pacer. It was full of Tri-Pacer stories and pictures, and that was my introduction and motivation to learn to fly,” he said. “And, of course, I fell in love with the Tri-Pacer because of the book.”

When he turned 15, Wyant started taking flying lessons at Dallas’s Addison Airport (KADS) in a Cessna 150. 

“Then, my dad and I got the idea of buying a Tri-Pacer together,” Wyant said. “We started looking around for a nice one. Turned out there was one for sale at Addison Airport where I was learning to fly. My dad and I went over to look at it together.”

“I just fell in love with it right there. We ended up buying it for $5,000.”

“Later that night, I snuck back into the hangar where it was parked. My best friend Jon Contreras and I just sat in it with the master on and all the lights flashing,” he said. “I wouldn’t have been more proud of it than if it was a new Learjet.”

“I finished up my license in 8664D at nearby Rockwall Municipal Airport (F46). The Tri-Pacer was a lot more fun to fly than the 150,” he said. “Two months after I got my license, I flew my mom and dad a thousand miles up to Indiana to see my grandmother. My parents were very trusting—neither of them were pilots. I even took my grandmother for a ride back in the summer of 1976. It doesn’t seem like that long ago.”

Wyant said that during his senior year in high school, he took a lot of his friends flying and that the guys on the football team were now looking up to him—literally.

“I was suddenly the big man on campus, so to speak,” he said. “Not many high school seniors have their own airplanes. The Dallas Morning News even did an article on me when I got my license on my 17th birthday.”

While Wyant loved his Tri-Pacer, once he was out of high school, his head was turned by airplanes that were just, well, sexier. 

“We had the Tri-Pacer for about a year, then sold it,” he said. “You always want to go further and faster. I went on to become a CFI and fly freight at night. After a while, I went to work flying for American Eagle, and finally as an international 767 pilot for American Airlines.”

8664D: Gone but not forgotten

Wyant spent a total of 22 years flying for American. While he loved his job, when the opportunity came along to take an early retirement from flying the line, he took it. Wyant had a logbook full of hours in a wonderful assortment of aircraft types, yet he never forgot about his first love.

“I always knew my Tri-Pacer was out there. I kept checking the FAA registry for it and fortunately nobody ever changed the N-number,” he said. “That airplane just meant so much more to me than tubing and fabric. It has a history with me—a short one, but a very meaningful one in my life.”

“My dad passed away some 18 years ago, and he was always very supportive of my flying. It was one of those things that he and I shared a great attachment to,” Wyant said. “My dad couldn’t fly because of poor hearing and eyesight. But that didn’t stop him from loving time in the cockpit. He loved to fly. This right seat was his whenever we flew together.”

“As time went on, whenever we would buy another airplane—whether it was the Mooney, Bonanza or Aerostar—when we flew together, we’d laugh and say, ‘It sure beats the Tri-Pacer.’ But, that’s not a bad thing. That little airplane meant something really special to us,” he said. “That’s why I had to get this airplane back.”

As luck, or maybe fate, would have it, Wyant’s first love was living not far away in Tyler, Texas, which is about 80 miles from his home in Dallas.

“I had searched out the owner’s phone number and called to see if he was willing to sell. His answer was no,” Wyant said. “About a year later, I called and asked again. Same answer. About another year later, I decided that I was going to give it one last shot, so I called and offered twice what it was worth. That got his interest.”

As Wyant happily admits, he ended up paying “stupid money” to get his beloved Tri-Pacer back. When it comes to settling affairs of the heart, some things just can’t be measured in money. 

She didn’t look at all like her yearbook photos…

“When the owner had finally agreed to sell the Tri-Pacer, he had described it as being in ‘excellent condition and always hangared,’” Wyant said. “After I arrived at the airport, I found that, yes it was in a hangar all right—but leaning up against the hangar was more like it. It was horrible-looking. It hadn’t been out of that hangar for a long time.”

Wyant was in too deep to turn back, so he bought 8664 Delta and flew her back to Addison. While many an owner would have been totally disheartened by the sad condition his high school sweetheart was in, Wyant saw it as an opportunity to not just bring his beloved Tri-Pacer back to the way he recalled, but to make her even better. 

“That’s when I contacted Darin Hart at American Legend Aircraft Co. When I decided to do a restoration, I didn’t want just any restoration—I wanted to make this Tri-Pacer as good or better than the day it left the factory in Lock Haven,” Wyant said. “You can’t find many people that can do that.”

And who better to do a “factory-fresh” restoration on the Tri-Pacer than a company that currently makes factory-new Cubs? That is precisely what the craftsmen at American Legend Aircraft Co. have been doing since 2004 with their popular Legend Cub series.

Along with manufacturing new Legend Cubs, Darin Hart has become a legend of sorts among the Piper community with the exceptionally high-quality aircraft rebuilds that come out of his facility in Sulphur Springs, Texas. 

“American Legend Aircraft Co. actually started from our work doing high-quality restorations on Cubs. I think we’ve won five or six Lindy Awards at Oshkosh over the years,” Hart said. “People call us on a weekly basis wanting to do a restoration on a Cub, Champ or Tri-Pacer, but they have to be really serious for us to do the job.”

“For us just to pull the covering off and replace it, without doing anything else, will take 400 man-hours and cost $38,000,” he said. “And that’s not sandblasting the frame or replacing any hardware. That’s just the covering. The price scares a lot of window-shoppers away.”

Hart said that when Wyant called him about rebuilding 8664D, his first response was that the airplane wasn’t worth the cost of just stripping and recovering it. 

“But then he explained the story behind it. I could tell that this wasn’t really about the airplane to Mark; it was much more,” Hart said. “I am proud that he put his trust in American Legend to do the work for him.”

You want it when?

While Wyant was more than happy to pay American Legend Aircraft Co.’s premium price for the work, there was one catch. 

“We started the project in late January, and Mark said he had to have it at Oshkosh that July. We had inside of six months to rebuild the Tri-Pacer,” Hart said. 

“I think he was a bit surprised when I said that would be no problem at all. We are a production shop, so we are used to getting airplanes in and out quickly. We don’t have room or time to keep projects sitting around for years.”

While the timeframe was not out of the ordinary, the team didn’t have any time to waste. Hart said that a big part of what sets an American Legend rebuild apart from others is the high level of research and detail they put into the project. 

After stripping the airplane and inspecting the steel tubing and wood ribs and components, they set about repairing and replacing whatever needed doing. All in all, Hart said, it was in serviceable condition for a 60-year old airframe.

“We took the frame down and sandblasted it clean, then replaced what metal tubing wasn’t up to our standards,” Hart said. “It’s essentially a new airframe. Then we replaced every nut, bolt, pulley and cable. Everything is brand-new.”

 

 

 

 

 

“Univair Aircraft Corp. has a tremendous stock of parts for these classic old Pipers. It was easy to buy practically everything we needed,” he said. “Control surfaces, ribs, flying wires, struts, the entire exhaust system—even the fairings that go around the struts—things you think you’d have to fabricate, you can buy from Univair.”

Hart said that instead of overhauling the 160 hp Lycoming O-320 engine, Wyant wanted a brand-new engine because that’s the way it left the factory in 1958. 

 

 

Speaking of achieving that factory look, Hart said that one detail that many restorers overlook is the painstaking replication of the original factory stitching. As Wyant recalled, “Darin went back and found the original build sheet on this airplane to find out how they laid the fabric on, how it was stitched and even the location of the ‘dollar patches.’” 

“The way American Legend stitched it all is exactly to the original Piper specifications published in the Piper production manual. Everything is as authentic as it can possibly be.”

“Also, most people don’t realize that the back half of the baggage compartment was originally made of canvas cloth,” he said. “Most have long since replaced it with the same fabric as they use to cover the exterior, but that’s incorrect. We found original OEM canvas and put it back where it belonged, including the strap that holds the tow bar in place.”

 

Back to the future

Of course, you can’t put all that work into making every detail factory correct and then rattle-can on any old paint scheme. So, while Wyant liked the yellow and white scheme the Tri-Pacer had when he flew her as a teenager, it wasn’t as she left the factory.

Since they already had Piper’s dimensional drawings of exactly where the stripes and N-number were laid out on the airframe, Hart contacted Piper restoration expert Clyde Smith, aka “The Cub Doctor,” to find out the exact colors the factory would have used in 1958.

“He knew by the serial number what the exact colors were for that airplane,” Hart said. “Santa Fe red and Daytona white. It’s a very classic combination for Pipers.”

“The only difference in the factory paint and what we used was that ours is shiny, while the factory originally used a matte finish. We felt the shiny paint would hold up better and be easier to clean,” Wyant said. “All of the interior fabric is also Piper spec. Turns out, it was the same upholstery that was originally from a 1958 Mercury Marquis automobile, which we were able to find from a supplier.”

 

Hart said that while finding the original material to redo the upholstery was easy; replacing the original batting material used for cabin soundproofing was much more labor-intensive. But, again, if it was done at the factory, it was replicated in Mark Wyant’s Tri-Pacer.

While it’s crystal clear that Wyant and American Legend spared no effort nor expense to make the Tri-Pacer as 1958 as possible, that type of originality won’t work when it comes to an airplane that’s actually going to fly in today’s airspace, especially with the 2020 ADS-B mandate on the horizon. 

 

 

 

 

N8664D goes NextGen

So how do you keep an airplane looking like it’s right out of 1958 while having all the avionics capabilities needed to safely navigate around Dallas’s busy airspace? Well, it turns out a bit of visual trickery does the job.

“My friend Jon—the same friend who sat with me in the airplane the night I bought it in 1976—and I took the panel rework on as our project. All of the instruments were sent to Keystone Instruments in Lock Haven where they were rebuilt, and the faces were repainted in the original off-yellow color,” Wyant said. “Most people think they’ve yellowed with age, but they were originally that color so that they would show up better when lit by the red cabin light.”

Wyant was even able to locate and reinstall the original Piper ashtray that came in the Tri-Pacer, not that there’s any smoking allowed. 

While he was able to add in many OEM details, when it came time for equipping the Tri-Pacer with modern avionics, Wyant was faced with a more difficult challenge. That’s where the high-tech trickery comes in.

“I wanted anyone looking in the cockpit to see an airplane the way it was in 1958, but I also needed avionics that give me the same safety and capabilities I have in my Citation Mustang,” he said. “To accomplish what I wanted, Jon took an original Narco Omnigator and a VLR-3 low-frequency receiver and cut them down so that they were about an inch and a quarter deep. We needed several “donor” radios to accomplish this, and it took over two months to pull it off.”

 

 

“We mounted them to a false panel piece that looks just like they are original. They even light up when you turn them on,” Wyant said proudly. “But, when you remove the faceplate, you’ll find a brand-new touchscreen Garmin GTN 750 and a Garmin GTX 345 ADS-B Out/In transponder. As it turned out, once installed in the panel, the height of the 750 and 345 were the same as the Omnigator and VLR-3 units, so it’s the perfect match.”

Another significant upgrade Hart and his team performed on the Tri-Pacer was the switch from the OEM BFGoodrich brakes to more modern and reliable Cleveland wheels and brakes. In addition, they replaced all the old incandescent exterior and interior lights with new LED lighting.

“Now I can leave all the strobes and landing lights on all the time, which is good for safety,” Wyant said. “For additional reliability, we also upgraded to a new lightweight, Sky-Tec starter and replaced the old alternator with a new 60 amp alternator.”

What goes around, comes around…

Wyant said that, true to their promise, the team at American Legend Aircraft Co. completed the “brand-new” Tri-Pacer in time for Hart to fly it to Oshkosh AirVenture 2017. 

“We put just about 1,800 hours into the total rebuild,” Hart said. “I have to say that it really turned out great. And that it’s a very nice flying airplane. I’ve flown it to Oshkosh, and to Sun ‘n Fun in Lakeland and it’s a very comfortable cross-country airplane.” 

“Although, I can see why Piper quit making them. They are very complex airplanes, and they couldn’t compete with the Cessna 172 for production,” he said. “In particular, the control cables—being fully interconnected—were very sophisticated and labor-intensive to install. Compared to the Piper Cub, the Tri-Pacer is probably twice as complex to put together.”

No matter how complex the project was or how much it ultimately cost, Wyant says that he is thrilled with how his beloved Tri-Pacer turned out. 

“I believe it’s the finest example of a Piper Tri-Pacer in the world,” he said proudly. 
“I don’t mean that as any type of hyperbole, but I truly believe that we achieved our goal in every way.”

So, you ask, now that the Tri-Pacer is done, what are his plans for it?

“Back in 1958, people thought they were dumpy-looking and nicknamed them ‘flying milk stools,’ but today, I think they’ve become retro,” he said. “My son is 13 and he’s a fan of the way it looks and flies. I’m slowly teaching him to fly the Tri-Pacer, and he’s loving it.”

“Another funny part to our story is that the hangar where I originally found 8664 Delta is only about 75 feet away from my current hangar at Addison Airport,” Wyant said. “Today, my Tri-Pacer lives in my hangar next to my Citation, and my hangar office is right inside. Every day when I walk in, I take a minute to give her a little pat.”

“This is not just an airplane to me; it represents a lot of great memories and a very special part of my life and the people in it,” he said. “There is no question that I own the world’s most expensive Piper Tri-Pacer. And I’m totally fine with that.”

Dale Smith has been an aviation journalist for 30 years. When he’s not writing aviation articles, Smith does commission aircraft illustrations specializing in seaplanes and flying boats. Smith has been a certificated pilot since 1974 and has flown 35 different types of General Aviation, business and World War II vintage aircraft. Send questions or comments to .

RESOURCES >>>>>

TUBE-AND-FABRIC REPAIR AND RESTORATION SERVICES
American Legend Aircraft Co.
legend.aero

PARTS MANUFACTURERS AND SUPPLIERS – PFA SUPPORTERS
Garmin Ltd.
garmin.com

Hartzell Engine Technologies LLC (Sky-Tec starter)
skytec.aero

Parker Hannifin Corp. 
(Cleveland wheels and brakes) 
ph.parker.com/us/en/aerospace-wheels-and-brakes

Univair Aircraft Corp.
univair.com

Read more...
“Bold Warrior”: A New Pilot Buys a Piper PA-28-151 for Training & Traveling

“Bold Warrior”: A New Pilot Buys a Piper PA-28-151 for Training & Traveling

Photos by Mike Maez

Ever since I was a kid I’ve always been obsessed with anything fast. Anytime a plane would fly overhead, I was—and still am—the boy that would stop everything to look up and watch it fly by. I spent a lot of my teenage years playing various flight simulator games. 

As I grew older, my obsession with speed and adrenaline obviously led me to cars. I started racing cars as soon as I could drive and did everything from drag racing to professional-level drifting. 

One of the things I was always fascinated with though, was aviation. I just never thought it was possible to get into it so early in life. Boy, was I wrong. 

 

The fast track

A little over a year ago, I came across a picture on social media of my friend Alex Luke flying a C-172. Having no idea that he was a pilot, I messaged him immediately to tell him how envious I was of him flying planes. I begged him to take me for a ride. 

As it turns out, Alex was building time for an instrument rating, and was constantly spending money to rent the C-172. He was excited to hear how into aviation I was, and agreed to take me up on one of his flights.

I knew this was going to be something special, but I could never foresee what would be coming next. 

We went on one airplane ride and the aviation bug hit me hard. Less than a month later, Alex and I bought a plane together, and my life changed forever. 

I picked up my PPL within two-and-a-half months: I scored 93 percent on my written and passed my checkride on the first try. 

We. Went. Everywhere. 

It seemed like Alex and I were in the air more than we were on the ground—and I was loving every minute of it. We managed to put 300 hours on the airframe in the first four months of ownership. By then, Alex had finished his IFR, and I bought out his share as we had planned from the beginning.

 

A shiny new panel

Once the plane belonged solely to me, I began researching ways to personalize it. I have always been a tech nerd of sorts, so the panel was definitely something I had my eye on upgrading. 

I started the upgrade by installing a PMA450 audio panel from PS Engineering. I had all the audio panel wiring redone with four-place headset jacks and panel-powered Bose LEMO plugs. I then installed a Garmin GTX 330ES transponder and GNS 430W GPS, and linked them all together for ADS-B compliance. 

I also did my own custom mount under the throttle quadrants for a Stratus 2S to receive ADS-B In, and had an AirGizmos’ iPad panel mount installed. Finally I bought a sheet of real carbon fiber that I had laser cut to complete the panel.

 

A custom interior

Next up, I really wanted to bring the interior of the Warrior back to life. All of the aviation interiors I was finding online seemed very standard and ordinary. I really wanted something different that wasn’t run-of-the-mill and would also be durable. 

Through my research, I found that Ron from Aviation Creations was the go-to guy to talk to about this. Working with Ron, I carefully crafted my own overall design and picked all of the colors and fabrics to make it a truly custom interior. 

I completely revamped the Warrior’s interior head-to-toe, replacing everything that was worn out or broken, mainly with new OEM Piper parts and all new hardware. This included the headliner, rear bulkhead, glareshield—all of it. I had most of the interior plastics, including the overhead panel, wrapped in aviation-grade Ultrasuede, a synthetic microfiber. 

Doing all of the installation work myself with the help of my friend Alex Simpson, we also replaced all the windows with new solar control windows from Great Lakes Aero Products. I just took my time, and tried to research how to do the stuff online. I also got a lot of advice from my A&P/IA at Falcon Executive.  

I do my own oil changes and my own tire/tube changes as well. Basically anything that I am allowed to do I prefer to do myself. I am a perfectionist, and have the mindset of “do it once, do it right,”—and the same mindset applies to the Warrior. When I am not allowed to do something I work with the staff at Falcon Executive at Falcon Field Airport (KFFZ) in Mesa, Ariz.

 

Speed mods and STCs

The Warrior already had various speed mods installed when Alex Luke and I bought it. These included upgraded wheel pants from Knots 2U; wing root seals; and Laminar Flow Systems’ flap gap seals, flap hinge fairings and aileron seals. I did replace the landing light with a Teledyne LED light since the OEM light doesn’t provide as much illumination for night ops.

In addition, N4402X had the 180 hp “Bold Warrior” STC applied to it back in 1998. According to the STC, #SA1842NM was issued to Auto-Air and includes installation of a Lycoming O-360-A4M engine and a Sensenich 76EM8-0-60 propeller and associated installation components. 

The STC helps with flying all year long in the hot Arizona desert with high density altitude airports such as Sedona and Flagstaff. Given the flexibility of the extra horsepower—it essentially turns the aircraft into an Archer—and the robustness of the O-360 platform which is known to run well over its 2,000-hour TBO, we managed to put 450 hours on in the first year with no major issues or unwanted downtime. 

 

A variety of experiences

Over the first year of flying I have experienced a vacuum pump failure in flight, an alternator failure during runup, and got stuck on the taxiway of a very small airport due to a punctured tube. 

I’ve currently have amassed almost 200 hours of cross-country time in just over a year by doing trips all over the Southwestern United States with a lot of night cross-country stuff as well. I have also done numerous flights in and out of fairly busy airports like John Wayne-Orange County Airport (KSNA) in Santa Ana, Calif. and Tucson International (KTUS). 

Most of my flying these days consists of cross-country trips with my girlfriend to some of our favorite stops including San Diego, Orange County and Las Vegas. 

My future plans include adding an instrument rating—and likely upgrading to a larger single, so that I can haul more people to the beach.

After a little over one year of flying, I feel like I have seen a lot already. One of the things that I love about aviation is no matter how much you do, there is always so much more to learn.

 

Special thanks to Bruce and Brad at Falcon Executive Aviation; Ron Matta at Aviation Creations; and Alex Luke, Alex Simpson and Dax Rodriguez. Justin Derendal is a 34-year-old pilot residing in Peoria, Ariz., and an avid aviation enthusiast. He is a former race car driver and Honorary Commander of the USAF 607th Air Control Squadron at Luke AFB. Send questions or comments to .

RESOURCES >>>>> Upgrades and modifications – PFA supporters

Aviation Creations 
 
Bose Corp.
 
Garmin Ltd.
 
Great Lakes Aero Products, Inc.
 
Knots 2U, Ltd.
PS Engineering, Inc.
 
Stratus 2S
 
Teledyne Technologies Inc.

Other upgrades and modifications 

AirGizmos
Laminar Flow Systems
STC #SA1842NM
FAA certified repair stations
Arizona Aircraft Accessories, LLC
Falcon Executive Aviation
Read more...
Garmin Announces Year-End Aviation Webinars

Garmin Announces Year-End Aviation Webinars

October 31, 2018 - Garmin is pleased to announce the addition of several aviation webinars through the end of the year. Ranging from Garmin Pilot tips and tricks, cost-effective autopilot upgrades to low-cost avionics solutions, these free webinars offer pilots and customers with a broad overview of the latest Garmin has to offer, while also providing a general operational overview of its vast product line.

Autopilot Retrofits The GFC 500 and GFC 600 retrofit autopilots offer reduced maintenance, as well as safety- enhancing capabilities such as Garmin Electronic Stability Protection (ESP), underspeed/overspeed protection and coupled approaches. This webinar focuses on the features and benefits of both autopilots.

• Cost-effective Retrofit Autopilot Solutions, November 13th @ 7:00 PM CT

Low-cost Avionics Solutions Learn about upgrading an aircraft panel with cost-effective avionics such as the GDL 82 ADS- B Out datalink, the GTX 345 series all-in-one ADS-B transponders and the G5 electronic flight instrument.

• Low-cost ADS-B, Instruments & Avionics, November 8th @ 10:00 AM CT

Advanced Avionics Upgrades A wide variety of avionics upgrades including the TXi series touchscreen flight displays, GTN series navigators, GMA audio panels, GTX ADS-B transponders, autopilots and more provide aircraft owners with endless panel upgrade options.

• Avionics Upgrades – including the latest TXi series, December 5th @ 4:00 PM CT

ADS-B Solutions for Business Aviation This webinar focuses on a variety of Garmin ADS-B solutions available for a wide range of business jets on the market. Cost-effective solutions are currently available for some of the most popular business aircraft in the industry, including the Citation II/SII, Citation V, Learjet 20/30/60 and more.

• ADS-B Solutions for Business Aircraft, December 11th, 2018 @ 10:00 AM CT

Garmin Pilot Get insider tips and tricks for using the Garmin Pilot mobile app to make flight planning, navigation and flying easier – and more fun.

• Garmin Pilot Tips & Tricks, December 13th @ 4:00 PM CT

Garmin’s aviation business segment is a leading provider of solutions to OEM, aftermarket, military and government customers. Garmin’s portfolio includes navigation, communication, flight control, hazard avoidance, an expansive suite of ADS-B solutions and other products and services that are known for innovation, reliability, and value. For more information about Garmin’s full line of avionics, go to www.garmin.com/aviation.

Read more...
Garmin Begins Seamless Integration Between FltPlan.com & Garmin Pilot

Garmin Begins Seamless Integration Between FltPlan.com & Garmin Pilot

OLATHE, Kan./October 10, 2018/Business Wire — Garmin International, Inc., a unit of Garmin Ltd. (NASDAQ: GRMN), today announced the initial phase of integration between the Garmin Pilot™ app and the popular FltPlan.com web portal. As a result of Garmin’s acquisition of FltPlan.com in August, both companies have made rapid progress in merging portfolios. Beginning next week, pilots will be able to use FltPlan.com for pre-flight planning and filing, and automatically view the same flight plan within the Garmin Pilot app on Apple mobile devices. This announcement represents the first of a series of cohesive enhancements between the FltPlan.com website and the Garmin product line.

“We are proud to show early progress and eager to launch this integration between FltPlan.com and Garmin Pilot,” said Carl Wolf, vice president of aviation marketing and sales. “This announcement symbolizes the beginning of a much anticipated collaboration that merges the most widely-used flight planning and filing tool, with an industry-leading app. With this, we are thrilled to welcome FltPlan.com to the Garmin family and we look forward to growing our collective portfolios to provide our customers with an unrivaled suite of flight planning tools and services.”     

 

FltPlan.com and Garmin Pilot customers can now experience a seamless transition between the FltPlan.com website and the Garmin Pilot application within the United States, Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, Central America, Venezuela and Columbia. The initial phase of this integration allows customers to create a flight plan on the FltPlan.com website and automatically view the same flight plan information within the Trip Planning section of the Garmin Pilot app.

Within the app, customers can also view recent and future trips that have been created on the website. Once the flight plan populates in the app, pilots can transfer it wirelessly to compatible Garmin avionics or a Garmin integrated flight deck. Additionally, the popular navigation log found on the FltPlan.com website can also be viewed within Garmin Pilot under the NavLog tab in Trip Planning.  

Pilots can create a free FltPlan.com account to take advantage of web-based flight planning and flight management services, which includes access to weather, airport information, fuel prices, printable navigation logs, aircraft performance data and more. By using FltPlan.com and Garmin Pilot, pilots can easily transition from web-based planning, to the Garmin Pilot app and wirelessly transfer the data to compatible Garmin products, saving valuable time prior to any flight. To learn more and to create a free FltPlan.com account, visit www.fltplan.com.

The latest release of the Garmin Pilot app that incorporates FltPlan.com integration on Apple mobile devices will be available next week during the NBAA Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition, October 16-18, 2018 in Orlando, Florida. For new customers, Garmin Pilot is available from the Apple App Store as a free download for the first 30 days. After the 30-day trial period, customers may purchase an annual subscription of Garmin Pilot starting at $74.99. Visit www.garmin.com/aviation for additional information.

Garmin’s aviation business segment is a leading provider of solutions to OEM, aftermarket, military and government customers. Garmin’s portfolio includes navigation, communication, flight control, hazard avoidance, an expansive suite of ADS-B solutions and other products and services that are known for innovation, reliability, and value. For more information about Garmin’s full line of avionics, go to www.garmin.com/aviation.

Follow us at facebook.com/garmin, twitter.com/garmin, or youtube.com/garmin.

Read more...
Garmin Announces New Free Aviation Webinars

Garmin Announces New Free Aviation Webinars

August 1, 2018 - Garmin is pleased to announce it is expanding its robust line-up of popular aviation webinars. Ranging from Garmin Pilot tips and tricks, cost-effective autopilot upgrades to low-cost ADS-B solutions, these free webinars offer pilots and customers with a broad overview of the latest Garmin has to offer, while also providing a general operational overview of its vast product line.

New webinars that have been recently added to the 2018 Garmin aviation webinar schedule discuss a variety of topics and products, including:

Autopilot retrofits

The GFC 500 and GFC 600 retrofit autopilots offer reduced maintenance, as well as safety- enhancing capabilities such as Garmin Electronic Stability Protection (ESP), underspeed/overspeed protection and coupled approaches.

• Cost-effective Retrofit Autopilot Solutions, September 18th @ 4PM CT

• Cost-effective Retrofit Autopilot Solutions, November 13th @ 7PM CT

Experimental Avionics

Learn more about experimental avionics for homebuilt aircraft, including G3X Touch, the G5 electronic flight display, G3X autopilot, GMA 245 audio panel, GTN navigators and more.

• Garmin Avionics for Experimental Aircraft, September 11th @ 10AM CT

• Garmin Avionics for Experimental Aircraft, October 10th @ 7PM CT

Low-cost Avionics Solutions

Learn about upgrading an aircraft panel with cost-effective avionics such as the GDL 82 ADS- B Out datalink, the GTX 345 series all-in-one ADS-B transponders and the G5 electronic flight instrument.

• Low-cost ADS-B, Instruments & Avionics, August 23rd @ 4PM CT

• Low-cost ADS-B, Instruments & Avionics, November 8th @ 10AM CT

Advanced Avionics Upgrades

A wide variety of avionics upgrades including the TXi series touchscreen flight displays, GTN series navigators, GMA audio panels, GTX ADS-B transponders, autopilots and more provide aircraft owners with endless panel upgrade options.

• Avionics Upgrades – including latest TXi series, August 8th @ 7PM CT

• Avionics Upgrades – including latest TXi series, October 3rd @ 4PM CT

• Avionics Upgrades – including latest TXi series, December 5th @ 4PM CT

Garmin Pilot

Get insider tips and tricks for using the Garmin Pilot mobile app to make flight planning, navigation and flying easier – and more fun.

• Garmin Pilot Tips & Tricks, August 16th @ 10AM CT

• Getting Started with Garmin Pilot, October 23rd @ 4PM CT

• Garmin Pilot Tips & Tricks, December 13th @ 4PM CT

Aviation Portables

Explore Garmin’s wide range of portable solutions, including the aera 660 and aera 796 handheld navigators, ADS-B and SiriusXM datalinks, D2 aviator watch wearables, as well as VIRB action cameras.

• Garmin Portable Solutions, September 25th @ 7PM CT

Garmin’s aviation business segment is a leading provider of solutions to OEM, aftermarket, military and government customers. Garmin’s portfolio includes navigation, communication, flight control, hazard avoidance, an expansive suite of ADS-B solutions and other products and services that are known for innovation, reliability, and value. For more information about Garmin’s full line of avionics, go to www.garmin.com/aviation.

Read more...
GWX 75 Aviation Doppler Weather Radar from Garmin®

GWX 75 Aviation Doppler Weather Radar from Garmin®

Four-times more color contouring for superior weather analysis

OLATHE, Kan. /July 18, 2018/Business Wire — Garmin International, Inc., a unit of Garmin Ltd. (NASDAQ: GRMN), today announced the GWX™ 75, a new addition to its suite of weather radars. Intended for a wide range of aircraft, the Doppler-based, solid-state GWX 75 incorporates exceptional range and a new, enhanced color palette that features more color contouring than traditional weather radar on the market. A helicopter version of the weather radar, the GWX 75H is also available. Optional features such as turbulence detection and ground clutter suppression are also available with the GWX 75.

“We are thrilled to continue to broaden our suite of weather radar solutions that meet the needs of thousands of aircraft operators throughout the world,” said Carl Wolf, Garmin vice president of aviation sales and marketing. “With improved features, a lower cost of ownership and easy upgrade path, the GWX 75 is a simple and straightforward weather radar solution that increases situational awareness to aid in navigation around severe weather.”

The GWX 75 provides pilots with a source of on-board weather information to assist in the analysis of convective weather threats, which aids in situational awareness and helps reduce aircraft operational costs. Pilots can tailor a unique weather picture on each individual display in the cockpit, offering superior customization. A high-definition color palette also helps pilots more easily interpret the severity of an individual storm cell or multiple storm cells in an area, which can incorporate four-times more color contouring than typically displayed by other weather radars on the market.

Boasting a solid-state design, the GWX 75 offers reduced power consumption and extended life compared to earlier generation, magnetron-based weather radars. The GWX 75 offers a range of 320 nautical miles, horizontal scan angles of up to 120 degrees and to focus on an area of interest, pilot-adjustable sector scanning. The GWX 75 also retains vertical scan capabilities, which allows the pilot to focus on storm tops, gradients and storm cell build-up at various altitudes.

Utilizing the GWX 75, pilots can more confidently navigate around challenging weather with optional features such as Doppler-enabled turbulence detection and ground clutter suppression. Turbulence detection identifies turbulence in air containing certain particulates, such as precipitation, while ground clutter suppression allows the GWX 75 to separate radar ground returns and remove them from the display. Additionally, Garmin’s exclusive WATCH® (Weather Attenuated Color Highlight) helps to identify shadowing effects of short-range cell activity and highlights areas where radar returns are weakened or attenuated by intense precipitation to allow for more precise weather interpretation.

Additionally, Garmin is launching a new Weather Radar Operations eLearning course, which is available immediately via the flyGarmin® website. This course helps pilots get the most out of a Garmin weather radar by discussing a variety of topics and reviewing operational techniques, such as tilt and range management, weather radar display interpretation, as well as automation and task management. An interactive session also allows pilots to manipulate the controls of the weather radar as various features and settings are reviewed within the PC-based course. This course is available for $149 and comes with a two-year subscription. For additional information, visit https://fly.garmin.com/fly-garmin/.

The GWX 75 is designed as a direct replacement for the GWX 70 or as a new installation in a wide variety of aircraft and is compatible with select Garmin integrated flight decks, the GTN™ 650/750 series touchscreen navigators, the TXi series and G500/G600 flight displays. Customers can later upgrade from the GWX 75 to the GWX 80 weather radar with ease. Garmin has received Technical Standard Order (TSO) certification for the GWX 75 and GWX 75H weather radars, which are expected to be available in August starting at a suggested retail price of $21,995 and $31,995 respectively. For additional information, visit www.garmin.com/GWX75 or contact .

Garmin’s aviation business segment is a leading provider of solutions to OEM, aftermarket, military and government customers. Garmin’s portfolio includes navigation, communication, flight control, hazard avoidance, an expansive suite of ADS-B solutions and other products and services that are known for innovation, reliability, and value. For more information about Garmin’s full line of avionics, go to www.garmin.com/aviation.

For decades, Garmin has pioneered new GPS navigation and wireless devices and applications that are designed for people who live an active lifestyle. Garmin serves five primary business units, including automotive, aviation, fitness, marine, and outdoor recreation. For more information, visit Garmin's virtual pressroom at garmin.com/newsroom, contact the Media Relations department at 913-397-8200, or follow us at facebook.com/garmintwitter.com/garmin, or youtube.com/garmin.

Read more...
Garmin® D2 Delta - Latest Generation in Aviator Watches

Garmin® D2 Delta - Latest Generation in Aviator Watches

Three distinct sizes with internal music storage, Garmin Pay and optional wrist-based Pulse Oximeter

OLATHE, Kan. /July 18, 2018/Business Wire — Garmin International, Inc., a unit of Garmin Ltd. (NASDAQ: GRMN), today announced the D2TM Delta PX, D2 Delta S and D2 Delta aviator watch series, three new GPS-enabled smartwatches built in a variety of sizes and personalities for pilots and aviation enthusiasts. New to the D2 aviator watch series, the D2 Delta PX incorporates built-in wrist-based Pulse Oximeter1 for oxygen saturation awareness. Additionally, all D2 Delta watches come with wireless connectivity with select Garmin avionics, Garmin PayTM contactless payment solution2, storage for music playlists and more. These features offer pilots more flexibility, greater connectivity and utility in a compact aviator watch that’s as functional as it is stylish.

“The D2 Delta series merges modern style and functionality in a sophisticated watch that is available in three distinct sizes tailored to male and female pilots and aviation enthusiasts,” said Carl Wolf, vice president of aviation marketing and sales. “Whether you’re climbing into a single-pilot cockpit on the weekend, shooting instrument approaches to minimums or flying professionally, the D2 Delta transforms the aviator watch market with exclusive aviation functions and connected features that appeal to every pilot – regardless of what flying they do.”

The premium D2 Delta PX features an elegant titanium gray diamond-like carbon (DLC) finish on a large, 51mm bezel. Especially useful in-flight and during high altitude activities, the D2 Delta PX exclusively incorporates wrist-based Pulse Ox to help monitor oxygen saturation levels.

The D2 Delta S features a stylish rose gold-tone bezel and is lighter, sleeker and smaller than previous D2 models. At 42mm, the D2 Delta S is ideal for smaller wrists and comes with a beige leather strap that makes it easy to transition from the cockpit to a night out. The third model in the series, the D2 Delta, measures 47 mm and has a silver titanium bezel, as well as a premium brown leather strap.

The D2 Delta series seamlessly integrates with select Garmin avionics to achieve a harmonious, connected cockpit. The D2 Delta can connect wirelessly to the Garmin PilotTM app, as well as the GTNTM 650/750 touchscreen navigator series or the G1000® NXi integrated flight deck via Flight Stream 510 to enable wireless flight plan transfer to the watch. When connected, all models in the new D2 Delta series can receive additional information from compatible avionics including GPS position information, altitude, airspeed, groundspeed, magnetic heading, outside air temperature and more.

Bluetooth®-capable music streaming enriches every activity as all models of the D2 Delta incorporate integrated music storage of up to 500 songs within the watch, offering phone-free listening. Download playlists from select music streaming services3 or transfer customized playlists from a computer directly to the watch. Once the playlist is loaded, pilots can pair a D2 Delta with a compatible Bluetooth Garmin audio panel such as the GMATM 245, GMA 345 or GMA 350c. The D2 Delta can also be paired with a Bluetooth headset or headphones (sold separately).

All sizes of the D2 Delta also include Garmin Pay, a contactless payment solution, allowing customers to leave their cash and credit cards at home. Utilizing their Garmin Pay wallet, customers have the same benefits and rewards of the physical cards, with the convenience of having them available on their wrist.

The D2 Delta aviator watch series also features new smartwatch alerting tailored to aviation operations. These new alerts include:

• Configurable pressure altitude notifications, which consists of a series of vibrations when arriving at a selected altitude;

• A fuel tank timer that vibrates at configurable intervals to help remind pilots to switch fuel tanks while in-flight;

• A cross track error notification, which triggers a vibrating alert when pilots deviate from an active flight plan.

The D2 Delta aviator watch series come preloaded with a full multisport toolset for running, golfing, cycling, skiing, workouts and more. It is also water rated to 100 meters so it can withstand swimming and other water activities. When paired with a compatible smartphone4, users can send, receive and respond to text messages and see social media updates, app alerts, calls, emails and more via the watch. Garmin ElevateTM wrist-based heart rate technology also monitors heart rate 24/7 alongside daily activity tracking. Because the D2 Delta is versatile and supports a variety of activities, QuickFit® bands allow users to easily switch between stylish leather and metal accessory bands to sporty silicone in seconds and without tools.

All of the new D2 Delta models come preloaded with a worldwide aviation database and incorporate signature aviation accents, dedicated direct-to and nearest airport buttons, as well as the option to input a customizable aircraft tail number on the face of the watch. A large, sunlight-readable, high-resolution color display with an LED backlight on the watch face, allows pilots to view data in most lighting conditions in the cockpit. The D2 Delta PX offers up to 18 hours of battery life in GPS and Pulse Ox mode and up to 20 days in smartwatch mode.

The D2 Delta aviator watch is expected to be available in August for a suggested retail price of $899 for the D2 Delta S; $949 for the D2 Delta; and $1,249 for the D2 Delta PX titanium edition. All three versions of the D2 Delta also come with a silicone band and free aviation database updates. Garmin will be showcasing the new D2 Delta aviator watch series at the 2018 EAA AirVenture fly-in, in Oshkosh, Wis., July 23-29, 2018. To learn more, visit www.garmin.com/D2.

Garmin’s aviation business segment is a leading provider of solutions to OEM, aftermarket, military and government customers. Garmin’s portfolio includes navigation, communication, flight control, hazard avoidance, an expansive suite of ADS-B solutions and other products and services that are known for innovation, reliability, and value. For more information about Garmin’s full line of avionics, go to www.garmin.com/aviation.

For decades, Garmin has pioneered new GPS navigation and wireless devices and applications that are designed for people who live an active lifestyle. Garmin serves five primary business units, including automotive, aviation, fitness, marine, and outdoor recreation. For more information, visit Garmin's virtual pressroom at garmin.com/newsroom, contact the Media Relations department at 913-397-8200, or follow us at facebook.com/garmintwitter.com/garmin, or youtube.com/garmin.

1. This is not a medical device and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or monitoring of any medical condition; see Garmin.com/ataccuracy. Pulse Ox is not available in all regions. 2. Available for supported cards from participating banks 3. May require a premium subscription by a third-party music provider. 4.When paired with a compatible smartphone; see Garmin.com/ble

 

Read more...
Garmin Pilot App Launches Real-Time Engine Data Display

Garmin Pilot App Launches Real-Time Engine Data Display

Garmin Pilot app launches real-time engine data display with play-back, best-in-class document viewer and more for Apple and Android mobile devices; adds weight and balance, weather enhancements and more

OLATHE, Kan. /July 18, 2018/Business Wire — Garmin International, Inc., a unit of Garmin Ltd. (NASDAQ: GRMN), today announced several new additions to the Garmin PilotTM feature set for Apple and Android mobile devices. Among the updates, wireless real-time display and play-back of engine data is available within Garmin Pilot via Flight Stream 510 when the app is paired with an EIS-capable TXi flight display or the G1000® NXi integrated flight deck. A new document viewer provides easy access to the Garmin aviation library, as well as access to popular cloud storage providers, and the addition of weather improvements further enhance the app. New for Android, weight and balance calculations and several more features aid in flight planning. These new capabilities offer greater utility within a single application and more integration within the Garmin ecosystem.

“With Garmin Pilot, customers receive an optimized Garmin experience, whether it’s monitoring engine performance, accessing Garmin pilots guides within the document viewer, database loading or wirelessly transferring flight plan data – pilots have it all easily accessible at their fingertips,” said Carl Wolf, vice president of aviation marketing and sales. “Garmin Pilot is a comprehensive application with capabilities that no other app on the market can deliver. A simple and familiar user-interface that closely represents Garmin avionics, cutting-edge integration and a competitive feature set combine to offer pilots the best value in the industry.”

Garmin Pilot for Apple mobile devices
flyGarmin® and Engine Information System (EIS) analytics

Exclusive to Garmin, customers will be able to utilize Garmin Pilot on Apple mobile devices to view real- time engine information via Flight Stream 510 when the app is paired with an EIS-capable TXi flight display or the G1000 NXi integrated flight deck. Upon landing, the flight data log is wirelessly uploaded to the flyGarmin website and is stored securely within the app and on flyGarmin. Within the flyGarmin website, pilots can access detailed information related to any flight, play back the flight and download data logs. Pilot-configurable exceedances can also be set within the flyGarmin website. In the event an exceedance occurs, pilots can receive an email alert that details that particular exceedance. Utilizing Garmin Pilot alongside an EIS-capable TXi flight display or G1000 NXi, pilots are provided with a comprehensive, in-depth look at engine performance and trend data and can more easily troubleshoot and identify potential issues.

Best-in-class document viewer

The new document viewer within Garmin Pilot helps pilots better organize and access a variety of informational products, including the latest Garmin library of manuals such as pilots guides and cockpit reference guides, aviation handbooks and more. The premium version of Garmin Pilot allows customers to access popular cloud storage sites like DropBox to create and add their own documents such as an aircraft flight manual (AFM) in PDF, JPG and PNG formats. Additionally, pilots can bookmark all electronic documents and highlight them for easy recall within the app.

Additional enhancements expected to be available for Apple mobile devices:

• The flight profile view within the app displays Pilot Reports (PIREPs) alongside airspace, terrain, obstacles, TFR’s and weather.

• Pilots can view the Area Forecast Discussion (AFD) within Garmin Pilot, which is a plain-English narrative developed by meteorologists at the National Weather Service.

• Model Output Statistics (MOS) are accessible within the app, which displays a forecast similar in format to the Terminal Aerodrome Forecast (TAF). The MOS is updated hourly and the forecast extends 72 hours into the future.

• Within the U.S. and Europe, pilots can view base reflectivity radar, which utilizes the lowest elevation scan to display precipitation falling from the clouds better than other radar scans.

• Transitioning across multiple Apple mobile devices or adding a new device to an existing account is easier as user preferences such as weight and balance, charts, settings, downloads and more are saved to the flyGarmin website.

• The new D2TM Delta PX aviator watch connects wirelessly to the app to display wrist-based Pulse Oximeter1 and heart rate data in the navigation bar and within the Connext® menu. Garmin Pilot also supports wireless flight plan transfer to the new D2TM Delta aviator watch.

• Pilots can create a custom map shape file on a computer to design a customized map so it’s easier to reference their position relative to a specific geographic area, such as a practice area. This map file is transferred from a computer via email and then uploaded within the app.

Garmin Pilot for Android mobile devices

Garmin Pilot on Android mobile devices incorporates weight and balance calculations into a flight plan or a saved trip, taking into account fuel burn and more. Pilots can take advantage of pre-loaded aircraft types or enter aircraft weight and balance figures manually, noting the arm, moment and station of each point from the Pilot’s Operating Handbook (POH). Center of gravity (CG) is easily referenced in the application relative to an active flight plan. In the event CG limits entered within the app are not loaded within the envelope, pilots receive a notification. Additionally, customized weight and balance profiles can be shared across multiple Garmin Pilot accounts.

Additional features expected to be available for Android mobile devices:

• Storm cell movement displays the projected path of a storm. An orange circle paired with a line that extends from the strongest storm cells shows its potential path in 15, 30, 45 and 60-minute intervals. If hail or tornadic activity is present, a corresponding icon will also be displayed alongside the particular storm cell line.

• Pilots can also view the Area Forecast Discussion (AFD) that is disseminated in a plain-English narrative within the app.

• The new D2TM Delta PX aviator watch and Garmin Pilot connect to display Pulse Oximeter1 and heart rate data in the navigation bar and within the Connext® menu. Wireless fight plan transfer to the watch is also supported by the app.

The newest release of Garmin Pilot for Apple and Android mobile devices is expected to be available next week during the 2018 EAA AirVenture fly-in, in Oshkosh, Wis., July 23-29, 2018. For new customers, Garmin Pilot is available from the Apple App Store and Google Play Store as a free download for the first 30 days. After the 30-day trial period, customers may purchase an annual subscription of Garmin Pilot starting at $74.99. Visit www.garmin.com/aviation for additional information.

Garmin’s aviation business segment is a leading provider of solutions to OEM, aftermarket, military and government customers. Garmin’s portfolio includes navigation, communication, flight control, hazard avoidance, an expansive suite of ADS-B solutions and other products and services that are known for innovation, reliability, and value. For more information about Garmin’s full line of avionics, go to www.garmin.com/aviation.

For decades, Garmin has pioneered new GPS navigation and wireless devices and applications that are designed for people who live an active lifestyle. Garmin serves five primary business units, including automotive, aviation, fitness, marine, and outdoor recreation. For more information, visit Garmin's virtual pressroom at garmin.com/newsroom, contact the Media Relations department at 913-397-8200, or follow us at facebook.com/garmintwitter.com/garmin, or youtube.com/garmin.

1.This is not a medical device and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or monitoring of any medical condition; see Garmin.com/ataccuracy. Pulse Ox is not available in all regions.

 

Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed

Cookies